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Page last updated at 18:35 GMT, Friday, 4 June 2010 19:35 UK

Jonathan Agnew column

BBC cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew
By Jonathan Agnew
BBC cricket correspondent, Old Trafford

There was a point, after about half an hour's play, when I couldn't see how anyone was going to get out.

The bowling looked pretty tepid, the pitch looked very flat and it just looked as if England were going to bed in and make an enormous score.

Pietersen was in aggressive mode before his dismissal
Pietersen was in aggressive mode before his dismissal

But once again England's batsmen, with the exception of Ian Bell, have managed to get themselves out, and that is disappointing.

Kevin Pietersen's shot was suicide. He knows that people are talking about his record against left-arm spinners and perhaps he is determined to prove that he hasn't got a problem and he can conquer them - I don't know what it is.

But that was just a suicidal stumping. He was nowhere near it. He could have nudged it away with his pad if he had seen he was in trouble, but he didn't even do that, he just went through with the shot and was stumped by miles.

Eoin Morgan will be disappointed that he didn't go on a make a big score.

Andrew Strauss has talked about people getting 50 and 80 and how those scores don't win you matches.

Morgan got 37 - he got the start, he got set and he got himself out. He should have taken this opportunity against Bangladesh to get a hundred and prove he can play at this level.

There will be some uncertainty about him now. They will definitely want to play him, they like him, but he hasn't backed up that faith with a good score.

Maybe, Pietersen and the other batsmen would play a bit more responsibly if England had taken the attacking option and fielded five bowlers.

There are two views: one theory is they are not going to play five batsmen against Australia, so why do it against Bangladesh?

The other view, which is mine, is that you should be flexible, you pick the right side for the match.

England have gone with just the one spinner in Graeme Swann and they were very much outgunned by Bangladesh in that department.

606: DEBATE
Choppingwood

It's very unusual to see the ball turning so much on the first day of a Test match in this country, and it's likely that the pitch will deteriorate further over the five days and we may see wickets tumbling to the spinners.

Bangladesh suddenly seemed to come to life in the middle of the afternoon when captain Shakib Al Hasan started to set more attacking fields.

The spinners made it really difficult and for the first time we actually saw Bangladesh's bowlers and fielders create some pressure. That's what they have got to do more often.

They've got to learn to seize the opportunity to attack when it comes around. I was impressed with them in that last session. They bowled very tidily and all in all it was a very encouraging day for the tourists.

But you'd still fancy if England manage to get 400 that should be a pretty decent total.

Lastly, the bright red new conference centre here at Old Trafford has come in for a bit of a battering today.

It sticks out like a big red thumb, dwarfing the pavilion, and some of the members claim they weren't consulted.

But to be fair to Old Trafford this is the start of a very big redevelopment. Maybe when the whole thing is done, it will be spectacular rather than ugly.

Jonathan Agnew was speaking to BBC Sport's Sam Sheringham



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see also
Bell stars for stuttering England
04 Jun 10 |  England
Bowler Finn awarded England deal
04 Jun 10 |  England
England v Bangladesh photos
04 Jun 10 |  England
Strauss coy on Shahzad selection
03 Jun 10 |  England
Sidebottom called up by England
01 Jun 10 |  England
England beat Bangladesh at Lord's
31 May 10 |  England
Live cricket on the BBC
26 Oct 11 |  Cricket
Bangladesh in England 2010
10 Jul 10 |  Cricket


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