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Page last updated at 10:42 GMT, Tuesday, 7 June 2011 11:42 UK

Blame players for Yorkshire slump, says Gerard Brophy

Gerard Brophy
South African Gerard Brophy is in his benefit season with Yorkshire

Yorkshire wicket-keeper Gerard Brophy says that the players are to blame for their poor form this season.

The Tykes have won just once in eight County Championship matches, twice in five games in the CB40 and have lost their first two in the FL t20.

"You can look for as many excuses as you like but, in my opinion, we're just not playing well enough," said Brophy.

"We're not up to the mark at the moment and it's not from lack of trying or training," he told BBC Radio Leeds.

"Our coach Martyn Moxon is a very meticulous man and makes sure we're well prepared before we go on the field.

"The only way we can get better is just by practising harder and then get into that winning habit because, once you've got that confidence of a win behind you, you just push on."

We've got some fantastic young players who have the potential and all the tools to go on and play for England

Gerard Brophy

Last season Yorkshire finished third in the County Championship and reached the semi-finals of the Clydesdale Bank 40 competition, a far cry from this season's struggles.

But South African Brophy, 35, believes that the future is bright for Yorkshire's youthful side.

"Over the last few years Yorkshire have gone back to where they were originally, playing all Yorkshiremen.

"Being one of the two guys who aren't Yorkshiremen, I do think it's a fantastic thing for the club.

"They don't have to go out and buy players in. They're growing their own players.

"We've got some fantastic young players who have the potential, and all the tools, to go on and play for England.

"Obviously it's going to take time for the young lads to come through and learn the game but, long-term, the picture looks really good for Yorkshire."



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