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Page last updated at 17:04 GMT, Monday, 20 October 2008 18:04 UK

Umpire Plews loses cancer battle

Nigel Plews
Nigel Plews' funeral will be held on 3 November in Mapperley

Former Test umpire Nigel Plews has lost his 18-month battle with cancer.

The 74-year-old from Nottingham, who was diagnosed with kidney cancer in March 2007, umpired 11 Test matches and 16 one-day internationals.

"He was a wonderful umpire and a tremendous human being," said Barrie Stuart-King from the International Community Cricket Trust.

"The outstanding thing about Nigel was that there wasn't one player who didn't respect him."

Plews began umpiring in 1960 and took up the job full-time after retiring from his position in the Nottingham City police force.

He was the first person to receive an Honorary Fellowship from the Institute of Cricket Umpires and Scorers, and joined the first-class umpires' list in 1982 - becoming one of the only umpires never to have played first-class cricket.

"Nigel made an enormous contribution to cricket through his deep knowledge and appreciation for the game, its laws and the way it should be played," International Cricket Council president David Morgan said.

"He was an advisor to the MCC and the ICC on matters relating to laws and playing regulations and made many important contributions while sitting on various committees and working groups that have had a lasting and positive impact on the game."

As a mark of respect, the umpires of the current Test matches between India and Australia, and Bangladesh and New Zealand, will wear black armbands - as will the officials for Tuesday's one-day international between Zimbabwe and Ireland.

His funeral is scheduled for Monday, 3 November at St Jude's Church in Mapperley.

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see also
Umpires make the grade
16 Nov 01 |  Cricket


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