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Sunday, 24 March, 2002, 03:37 GMT
Dalmiya pleased with ICC changes
Jagmohan Dalmiya
Dalmiya opposed the original probe into the Denness affair
Indian cricket boss Jagmohan Dalmiya believes that his controversial stand over the match referee controversy has been vindicated.

But the Board for Control of Cricket in India (BCCI) president refused to describe the International Cricket Council's (ICC) new plans as a "victory" for India.

"I am happy that the ICC agreed to all the points raised by us and that the ICC is functioning as a happy cricket family now," Dalmiya told a press conference on Saturday.

The ICC last week yielded to demands from the BCCI to reconstitute the panel to investigate the punishments given to six Indian players by referee Mike Denness in South Africa last November.


[The match referee] cannot act as a policeman and as a magistrate at the same time
Jagmohan Dalmiya
A new four-member disputes resolution committee was announced after two days of deliberations by the ICC Executive Board in Cape Town after Dalmiya had rejected the original make-up of the probe.

The new committee will be chaired by Michael Beloff, an English lawyer and will include Peter Chingoka of Zimbabwe, Bob Merriman of Australia and West Indies board president Wes Hall.

Dual role conflict

The Cape Town meeting also accepted proposals to place the onus on Test umpires to lay disciplinary charges.

The matter would then be referred to one of the referee to hold a hearing.

There will be a right of appeal against referees' decisions for more serious disciplinary offences and referees have been given the authority to explain their decisions to the media.

"We had contended that the ICC referee should not bring charges against any player himself," said Dalmiya.

"He cannot act as a policeman and as a magistrate at the same time."

The ICC recently announced a new, elite panel of five full-time referees, with former England captain Denness omitted from the list.

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