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Thursday, 6 December, 2001, 02:31 GMT
Kiwis express umpiring concerns
Daniel Vettori shakes hands with Ian Robinson after the Test
Daniel Vettori shakes hands with Ian Robinson
New Zealand have lodged a complaint with the International Cricket Council about the standard of umpiring in the final Test against Australia in Perth.

In a letter, New Zealand Cricket chief executive Martin Snedden questioned a number of decisions made by Zimbabwean umpire Ian Robinson.

He added that New Zealand Cricket hoped he would not receive another Test appointment.

Robinson rejected two critical appeals during Australia's second innings.


All I can do is put the feelings of New Zealand Cricket to the ICC
NZ Cricket chief executive Martin Snedden
Television replays showed Australian captain Steve Waugh and all-rounder Jason Gillespie were lucky to survive appeals for catches behind the wicket.

Snedden, a former Test medium pace bowler, said: "All I can do is put the feelings of New Zealand Cricket to the ICC, which I fully intend doing.

"I expect them to take that into account when it comes to future appointments and upgrading their panel."

The match and three-Test series were drawn when Australia, chasing 440 to win, ended the last day of the last Test seven wickets down and 69 runs short of their winning target.

Snedden said the New Zealand team had serious concerns about Robinson's competence.

From April next year Test matches will be controlled by officials drawn from a panel of the world's top eight umpires.

Snedden said New Zealand would continue to lobby for increased use of television technology to assist umpires' decision-making.

"Where the decisions are proved to be accurate and do not interfere with the game's flow, I can see no reason why it cannot be used," he said.

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