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  Wednesday, 1 November, 2000, 10:47 GMT
Match-fixing report: The main points
Brian Lara, Mark Waugh and Alec Stewart
Under scrutiny: Lara, Waugh and Stewart
BBC Sport Online digests the main allegations included in the 162-page report by India's Central Bureau of Investigation into the issue of corruption in cricket.

The report is largely made up of testimony from Indian bookmakers, as well as players. It does not amount to the levelling of formal charges against any of those named.

  • Former Indian captain Mohammed Azharuddin fixed cricket matches with the help of team-mates Ajay Jadeja and Nayan Mongia for large sums of money.

    Azharuddin confessed during interrogation to taking the money from a bookmaker, MK Gupta, and had named Jadeja and Mongia as his associates in the fraud.

  • West Indian batsman Brian Lara was accused by Gupta of accepting $40,000 to under-perform in two one-day internationals during the tour of India in 1994-95.

  • Former England captain Alec Stewart was named by Gupta as having accepted 5,000 for pitch, weather and team information.

    But Gupta stressed that both Stewart and New Zealander Martin Crowe - whom he claimed accepted $20,000 for match information - both refused his offers to fix matches.

  • Mark Waugh of Australia was also paid for passing on information, the bookmaker said.

  • The report explains that small-scale betting on cricket matches had taken place in India for many years - but it became big business, with bookmakers making huge profits, after India won the World Cup in 1983.

    Live television broadcasts fo the matches boosted the betting further, with the bookies making profitable use of computers and mobile telephones.

  • Australian batsman Dean Jones refused to accept an offer of $40,000 to provide match information to a bookmaker.

  • Former Indian all-rounder Manoj Prabhakar introduced several foreign players to bookmakers and provided information to the bookies about Test matches and one-day international matches.

  • The report said there was no evidence to support Prabhakar's accusations that former Indian captain Kapil Dev attempted to bribe him with $57,000 to throw a 1994 match against Pakistan.

  • Dr Ali Irani, a former physiotherapist of the Indian team, "acted as a conduit for receiving payments on behalf of Azharuddin from MK Gupta and associates".

  • In-depth section on corruption in cricket

    The clean-up begins

    The key players

    Background features

    INTERACTIVE GUIDE

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