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Page last updated at 08:04 GMT, Friday, 7 November 2008
Stars out for MTV Europe Awards

By Andy Brownstone
Newsbeat reporter, MTV Europe Music Awards, Liverpool

It was a top night for US stars at the MTV Europe Music Awards, with Britney Spears and 30 Seconds To Mars taking two gongs each. Katy Perry scooped best newcomer, while '80s crooner Rick Astley won best act ever. Newsbeat reporter Andy Brownstone was backstage.

Pink, Kanye West, Estelle and Katy Perry
American acts like Pink dominated proceedings in Liverpool

As a huge group of mainly female, mainly teenage, mainly skinny MTV fans filed past us to get into the main arena, I heard a photographer mutter: "City of culture, city of orange more like."

There are certainly a very high ratio of perma-tanned girls around here. It looked like they were kept penned up by the entrance in order to scream when celebs arrived.

And they shipped a rent-a-crowd up to the red carpet area to bring some atmosphere.

What they actually did was make so much noise, the journalists could hardly hear what the stars were saying.

Take That and Katy Perry got the biggest cheers, but so many party poppers went off they almost gave Dave Keuning from The Killers a heart attack.

The pride of British females paraded past; Duffy, Leona and Estelle.

In the arena, possibly the biggest cheer of the night went to Estelle when she came on to join Kanye West for American Boy.

Bill Kaulitz
Bill Kaulitz of Tokio Hotel probably had the biggest hair

While backstage, Kelly Rowland brought four women with her, who gently moved her hair our of her eyes before the official photos.

Haircut of the day however, belonged to the lead singer of Tokio Hotel. The German rockers, who won the headliner award, are massive in pretty much every country apart from the UK.

Not as massive as Bill Kaulitz's hair though. It's like a big black version of Sonic the Hedgehog.

At the Latin MTV awards earlier this year they scooped four awards including best ringtone, randomly.

There's talk that they're about to break the UK, and they certainly act that way.

They were the only band to have what can only be described as two secret service agents following their every move. It was like something from 24.

The Stereophonics breezed through saying they didn't like award ceremonies, but in the same breath shamelessly plugged their new greatest hits album.

And for some bizarre reason, in amongst all the A-list music stars, was Michael Owen.

The Newcastle and England star looked out of place, and looked like he felt out of place too.

Liverpool stars Robbie Keane, Jamie Carragher and Jermaine Pennant were having a much better time with their WAGS.
Sir Paul McCartney
Sir Paul McCartney was named ultimate legend in his home town

And Craig David was honest and open about one of my own worst fears, where you start sweating under top, and then face the dilemma of keeping the top on to save face and perspiring even more, or taking it off and showing everyone your patches.

I went for the latter and kept the Lynx Africa close by my side all night.

The biggest commotion of the evening was when legend Sir Paul McCartney came backstage to do photos and interviews.

It was like all those black and white films of Beatlemania, but happening right in front of me.

My two moments of the night came in Pink's rendition of So What.

During the final chorus a gang of pillow-fighting, underwear-clad beauties stormed the stage.

I almost fell over laughing when I saw one bloke try to give another a wedgy. And at the end, as Pink got a mouthful of the thousands of feathers floating down over the stage, I saw Peter Kay/Geraldine collapsing at the end of Britain's Got Pop Factor.

It was a beautiful moment.

Local band the Ting Tings summed up the feelings of all the Merseysiders on stage and in the audience, when they said: "It's just round the corner so we get a lie in tonight in our own beds."

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