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Page last updated at 07:57 GMT, Friday, 12 December 2008
Jade 'glad' to help cancer awareness

Jade Goody says she's happy that her treatment for cervical cancer is drawing attention to the disease and that she's determined to carry on with normal life.

Jade Goody

There are lots of mixed reports about your cancer diagnosis. Can you clear them up for us?

The reason why I think it's all been mixed up is because my treatment has all been mixed up. First of all I was like stage one cancer, possibly stage two. Then when I had my operation, it was like a 95% chance of survival. When I had my operation they realised it was actually a lot worse than they thought. So it had spread.

Why did you have cameras follow you around through this?

Seven years ago I put myself in the spotlight. From seven years until now I've lived my life in the spotlight. This is my job. I know it's ridiculous but this is my job. And I don't have a boss that says, 'Oh. I'm gonna pay you sick leave or I'm gonna do this'. This is my job. This is how I support my family.

Cervical cancer
3,000 UK women diagnosed each year
Occurs frequently in women under 35
Most common symptom: Abnormal bleeding between periods
Regular smear tests help prevent the disease
Treatments include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy
Source: NHS website

I have to work and this is my job. But also, more to the point, I'm in a position where I can highlight what cervical cancer is, because I never ever heard of it. I'd heard of breast cancer and testical cancer. But I'd never heard of cervical cancer.

I didn't ever think it was that serious. I was completely wrong. Since doing it and since being as outspoken as I have been and cameras following me and that, I don't think it's a bad thing because smear tests have gone up. The cervical jab, the jab thing, has come in and now the NHS are giving it to 16-year-olds and 18-year-olds.

So there's two good things already that's come out of it. So, as far as I'm concerned, I don't really care. And I'm going through my hormones as well. I'm 27 and I'm going through my menopause. Again, there are other people out there that are doing that as well.

When you have chemotherapy do you think you'll be able to carry on as normal?

When I first got told I had cancer, my agent was like, 'You can't do panto'. I was like, 'I really want to do it. I wanna try'. And if I can't, then I can't. I'm physically too weak to do it. I wanna try. I am one of these people that is a tryer and will try.

I think people react to chemotherapy, radiotherapy and cancer completely different. Everybody's an individual in this sort of thing. Throughout my five week chemo and radiotherapy there were points where I was a bit weak. Then there were points where I was fine. And that's what you do. You get a dip where you're fine and then you come back out of it again.

Your kids don't know you have cancer. Are you worried they might find out?

My boys know I've got tadpoles in my belly and I have medicine and the medicine makes the tadpoles go to sleep, which makes me tired
Jade Goody explains her cancer treatment to her two children
To be honest with them, cancer to a five and four-year-old doesn't mean nothing. They don't understand what it is. My boys know I've got tadpoles in my belly and I have medicine and the medicine makes the tadpoles go to sleep, which makes me tired.

When the tadpoles disappear they get very hungry so they eat all the cells that make my hair grow and my hair falls out. That's all that my boys need to know. I want to keep my kids as innocent as I can. I wasn't an innocent child.

When I was five I knew every single drug there was. I was hiding text books. I was dodging from the police and my mum and stuff like that. I wasn't innocent and it's nothing to be proud of. I want my children to be innocent.

Jade Goody was talking to Newsbeat entertainment reporter Sinead Garvan.

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