Related BBC sites

Page last updated at 07:22 GMT, Thursday, 4 December 2008
'Shocking' anti-cocaine ad launched

Pablo the dog drug mule
Pablo the drug mule is on a quest to find out more about cocaine
A dead dog is the star of a new government advert to warn people about cocaine use.

The graphic TV and online adverts see the dog "wake up" and set off to find out about the drug that led to his death.

"Pablo the Drug Mule Dog" questions a dealer, a user - and surreally - a heart, a nostril and a bank note.

It's part of a 1m campaign aimed at making 15 to 18-year-olds more aware of the dangers of cocaine and the poor countries it comes from.

It comes as government statistics show that the number of people admitted to hospital because of coke overdoses has gone up by four times in just eight years.

Cocaine use has also doubled in the last 10 years, according to the British Crime Survey.

In 1998 only 0.5% of people questioned had used the drug in the previous month, a figure which rose to 1% last year.

Frank spokesman Dr Ken Checinski said: "Cocaine is psychologically more addictive than many other substances, such as alcohol and cannabis, and can easily become a habit that controls your life.

"It's also cut with various toxic ingredients and is known to put extreme pressure on the heart, putting the user at serious risk of a heart attack - no matter what their age."

The advert will be shown on Wednesday night on Channel 4 at 10.15pm.



RELATED BBC LINKS

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific