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Monday, 2 April, 2001, 14:36 GMT
Online 1000 figures: The issues

A new survey carried out for BBC News Online suggests Labour has stolen a march on the Conservatives in key policy areas.

The party leads on five topics - health, education, crime, transport and the economy - while the Conservatives are ahead only on Europe.

And party leader William Hague is seen as a less popular choice for prime minister than his Labour rival Tony Blair.

A detailed breakdown of the survey results can be seen below. (Story first published 17 February, 2001.)

ICM interviewed a random sample of 1004 adults via the internet between 6 and 9 February 2001. Interviews were conducted across the country and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults.
Q.1 Who do you trust to run the NHS most effectively?
Question 1
Q.2 Who do you trust to run state schools most effectively?
Question 2
Q.3 Who do you trust to best manage the economy?
Question 3
Q.4 Who do you think has the best policies to tackle crime?
Question 4
Q.5 Who do you think will best protect the UK's interests in the European Union?
Question 5
Q.6 Who do you think has the best Public Transport policies?
Question 6
Q.7 Finally which party leader do you think would make the best prime minister?
Question 7

Prepared for BBC News Online by ICM Research Ltd.

The BBC News Online 1000 will continue to give their opinions on political issues over the election campaign.

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Related stories:

17 Feb 01 |  UK Politics
Labour leads poll on the issues

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