BBC HOMEPAGE | NEWS | WORLD SERVICE | SPORT | MY BBC low graphics | help
news vote 2001search vote 2001
 You are in: Vote2001
VOTE2001 
Main Issues 
Features 
Crucial Seats 
Key People 
Parties 
Results &  Constituencies 
Opinion Polls 
Online 1000 
Virtual Vote 
Talking Point 
Forum 
AudioVideo 
Programmes 
Voting System 
Local Elections 
Nations 

N Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 

BBC News

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

 A/V REPORTS
Dr Mike Woodin, an environmentalist and a farmer
discuss the Green Party's policies
 real 28k

Friday, 18 May, 2001, 12:27 GMT
Greens: Scrap nuclear energy
Jean Lambert MEP, Mike Woodin, Margaret Wright and Darren Johnson
The Green Party unveil their manifesto in London
The Green Party in England and Wales unveiled its election proposals on Friday with an emphasis on the environment and social justice.

At the heart of the Greens' manifesto is a pledge to raise income tax for higher earners and to make a huge investment in non-nuclear renewable fuels.


The Green Party offers a complete reform of taxation and benefits for wealth redistribution

Dr Mike Woodin
The party, which has yet to win seats in the Westminster parliament, also advocates the renationalisation of the railways and an increase in tax on fuel.

The Greens plan to scrap car tax, nuclear power and ban factory farming.

Dr Mike Woodin, a principal speaker for the party, and author of the manifesto entitled Reach for the Future, said the Greens were promising a "just" economic future.

"The Green Party offers a complete reform of taxation and benefits for wealth redistribution, backed by comprehensive policies for sustainable job-creation and economic self-reliance," he said.

Electoral progress

The Greens have made progress in recent years, securing council, Greater London Authority (GLA) and European parliamentary seats.

Darren Johnson, leader of the Green group on the GLA, outlined his party's stance on globalisation offering "ecological and social justice rather than business at any price, and localisation rather than globalisation".

Mike Woodin
Mike Woodin wrote the manifesto
Other pledges include the scrapping of university tuition fees and ending prescription, eye test and dental charges as part of a health service shake up.

The Greens' hope to consolidate support in their urban areas such as Oxford, Stroud, Kirklees, Lancaster, Manchester and Brighton.

Fighting for seats

They are fighting 140 seats in England and Wales and four in Scotland.

Mr Woodin said winning 5% of the vote in seats and saving deposits would be a "benchmark of success".

But a good campaign in the Westminster elections could yield a greater share of the vote at local and European elections.

Ultimately that could provide the necessary momentum towards establishing a presence at Westminster, Mr Woodin suggested.

He acknowledged that policies such as the party's renationlisation proposals for Railtrack, were "unattractive to people on the right" who might otherwise be drawn to the Greens because of their pledge to promote organic farming and ban GM food.

But he insisted: "You cannot sustain an ecologically just society without a socially just society because you need everyone to feel they are part of that society.

"We believe we can lead people to this agenda in ways that might take them by surprise."

 A/V CONSOLE
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS

Latest stories

TALKING POINT

AUDIO/VIDEO

INTERACT
PARTY WEB LINKS



The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


Related stories:

18 May 01 |  Vote2001
Green manifesto: At-a-glance
23 Mar 01 |  UK Politics
Greens set sight on electoral success
09 Sep 99 |  UK Politics
Greens 'celebratory conference' begins
25 May 99 |  UK Politics
Greens kick-off Euro campaign
06 Mar 01 |  UK Politics
Blair seeks green credentials
19 Mar 00 |  UK Politics
Kennedy seeks green revival
©BBC