BBC HOMEPAGE | NEWS | WORLD SERVICE | SPORT | MY BBC help
news vote 2001search vote 2001
 You are in: Vote2001: Main Issues: Correspondent Analysis
VOTE2001 
Main Issues 
Correspondent Analysis 
Features 
Crucial Seats 
Key People 
Parties 
Results &  Constituencies 
Candidates 
Opinion Polls 
Online 1000 
Virtual Vote 
Talking Point 
Forum 
AudioVideo 
Programmes 
Voting System 
Local Elections 
Nations 

N Ireland 
Scotland 
Wales 

BBC News

BBC Sport

BBC Weather
Sunday, 1 April, 2001, 13:34 GMT 14:34 UK
The changing face of poverty and benefits

The BBC's family correspondent Kim Catcheside looks at the changing face of poverty and benefits.

Poverty

Efforts to eradicate poverty are affected by ideological differences. Are poor people as badly off today as they were 50 years ago? What actually makes people poor? Do increases in state benefits just take away the incentive to go out and get a job? There are no easy answers, but the questions are crucial for the millions of adults and children who are officially classified as poor in the UK.

 Click here to watch

Pensions and pensioners

There is a big debate about how best to help pensioners. Governments are keen to target help to those who are worst off, but campaigners for the elderly say raising the universal state pension to perhaps 100-a-week is the best way. Many fear the prospect of a pensions gap being created. Those who have private pensions are getting richer, but many of tomorrow's pensioners either aren't saving enough or at all.

 Click here to watch

Childcare

Childcare is central to the campaign to get families off welfare and into work. People who take low-paid or part-time jobs may need help with the cost of caring for their children. But there are worries that some people are being trapped by a combination of a low-paid job and state benefit, giving them no incentive to better themselves. It is feared that others who really cannot work may become left behind, struggling on benefits alone.

 Click here to watch

Disability

There is some concern among disabled people over new laws about job-seeking and benefits. Those who can work are being given the strongest incentives to do so. All but the most severely handicapped are now being asked to attend interviews with job advisers, or risk losing money.

 Click here to watch

 A/V CONSOLE
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
©BBC