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The best places to see bluebells in Surrey
By Heather Driscoll-Woodford
BBC Surrey

Bluebells in Camberley. By Patrick
Before the rose, the bluebell was the floral emblem of England

Modern technology may be taking over the world, but some of the more simple and traditional pleasures will never lose their appeal.

Bluebell season is here again and it is time to head to the woods as the forest floor turns into a carpet of velvety blue flowers.

Many of you will have a favourite place where you can see the 'fairy flowers' in bloom at this time of year.

For those who don't, here is a guide to the best bluebell sites in Surrey.

Chiphouse Wood, Chiphouse Bottom

Grid reference: TQ260570

Managed by the Woodland Trust. This ancient woodlands boast over 20 acres of broad leaved trees and bluebells.

Edolphs Copse, Charlwood

Grid reference: TQ236425

Managed by the Woodland Trust , these ancient woodlands are half a mile north-west of the village of Charlwood. Apparently recommended by Dale Winton! Look for raised areas of ground (hummocks) which possibly date back to the Ice Age.

Glover's Wood, Charlwood

Grid reference: TQ227406

Managed by the Woodland Trust, this is a 63 acre area of ancient woodland, including a site of special scientific interest. Wood from here was used to make charcoal for the iron industry.

BLUEBELL FACTS

Winkworth Arboretum in Godalming. By Jan Welsman.
Winkworth Arboretum has stunning displays of old English bluebells

Before the rose, the bluebell was the flower emblem of England.

Legend has it that bluebells should never be brought into the house!

Bluebells were known as fairy flowers. If you damage bluebells in the woods the fairies (called Oakmen) will make sure you get lost!

During the witch trials in olden times, it was dangerous to have bluebells growing in your garden, as it could be taken as a sign you were in league with the fairies, and therefore a witch!

In the 13th Century, monks used bluebells to treat leprosy.

In the language of Flowers bluebells stand for constancy.

Great Earls Wood, Limpsfield

Grid reference: TQ407487

Managed by the Woodland Trust. Small but perfectly formed woodland, situated on the Surrey border, close to the Greensand Way.

Hammond's Copse (Prestige Wood), Newdigate

Grid reference: TQ212441

Managed by the Woodland Trust. An ancient semi-natural woodland, with an abundant bird population. Oak from here was once used to build ships, as well as to supply local industries. Also called "Prestige Wood" after a major benefactor, the Prestige Hotels chain.

Hatchlands Park, East Clandon

Grid reference: TQ063516

Telephone: 01483 222482

The National Trust owned, famous bluebell heaven and retreat. A one-mile walk takes you through Little Wix Wood with its bluebells and primroses.

Leith Hill, Holmbury St Mary

Grid reference: TQ139432

Telephone: 01306 711777

The highest point in the SE. On a good day you can see 13 counties, London and the English Channel. Has an 18th century Gothic viewing tower. As well as bluebells there are rhododendrons, which allegedly were planted by Charles Darwin's sister, Caroline.

Little Earls Wood, Oxted

Grid reference: TQ406489

Managed by the Woodland Trust, it has over 6 acres of ancient broad leaved woodland.

Ricketts Wood, Charlwood

Grid reference: TQ230428

Managed by the Woodland Trust. The woodland is oak forest dating from the 1900s. There is a easy, circular route which takes a pleasant 15 minutes to complete.

Staffhurst Wood, Limpsfield

Grid reference: TQ413490

Managed by the Woodland Trust. This wood was originally part of a royal hunting forest in Saxon times. More recently it was used WWII as an ammunitions dump. The whole area is covered by a Tree Preservation Order.

Winkworth Arboretum, Godalming

Grid reference: SU990412

Telephone: 01483 208477

The National Trust owned hillside arboretum is home to an old English bluebell wood, as well as displays of magnolias and azaleas.




SEE ALSO
Will the bluebells bloom in time?
07 Apr 10 |  Nature & Outdoors
Bluebells could help fight cancer
20 Jan 98 |  Sci/Tech

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