Page last updated at 09:24 GMT, Wednesday, 14 July 2010 10:24 UK
Remembering the works of Goodwin
Geraint Goodwin
Goodwin started his career as an apprentice on The Montgomeryshire Express, before moving to London's Fleet Street to work on The Daily Sketch

A new society is being formed to appreciate the work of a Newtown-born writer who died nearly 70 years ago.

The Geraint Goodwin Society is the brainchild of Joan How and Mary Oldham who want to encourage readers to enjoy the author's writing.

Born in Llanllwchaiarn, Newtown, in 1903, Goodwin made his name by writing four novels and a volume of short stories.

But he suffered from Tuberculosis for many years and died, aged 38, in 1941.

If anyone has any information, knowledge or materials that are relevant to Geraint Goodwin their contact with the society would be greatly appreciated
Joan How

There is a plaque in his honour on the wall of Barclays Bank in Newtown.

Ms How said: "These lyrical, often heart-breaking stories take the reader deep into the heart of early 20th century mid Wales, its towns and villages.

"Its unforgettable men and women struggle with love, change, ambition and loss."

Sanatorium

Goodwin started his career as an apprentice on The Montgomeryshire Express, before moving to London's Fleet Street to work on The Daily Sketch.

In 1930 he found that he was suffering from TB and he had to spend months in a sanatorium.

Geraint Goodwin
Geraint's third novel was written in Upper Corris, near Machynlleth

This experience provided the impetus for his first novel, Call Back Yesterday (1935)

After its publication, he secured a contract to write another two novels and he gave up his work as a journalist to concentrate on his creative writing full-time.

He moved with his wife and daughter from London to Dagnall in Buckinghamshire where he started to write about rural life.

The first product of this stage of his career was The Heyday in the Blood (1936), his most famous work.

The White Farm

His next novel, Watch for the Morning was published in 1938 which was followed the next year by Come Michaelmas.

This book was written in Upper Corris, near Machynlleth, where he had moved to live in a cottage in 1938, and where his son was born.

Geraint Goodwin also published a collection of short stories, The White Farm, in 1938.

Ms How added: "If anyone has any information, knowledge or materials that are relevant to Geraint Goodwin their contact with the society would be greatly appreciated.

"Until the society is established on a firm foundation membership will be free of charge."

For those who may be interested in becoming a member, and/or feel they can assist in any way, please contact Mrs Joan How for more information at maghow@tiscali.co.uk




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