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Page last updated at 12:34 GMT, Tuesday, 18 May 2010 13:34 UK
Baby octopus rescued by fisherman
Octopus Sadie
The octopus nicknamed Sadie by skipper David Pascoe who rescued her

A tiny octopus is recovering at Newquay's Blue Reef Aquarium after being discovered hauled up in the nets of a Cornish fishing boat.

The two-centimetre-long curled octopus was spotted clinging to the netting by an eagle-eyed deckhand on board the fishing vessel 'Silver Pearl'.

Whilst the crew were sorting their nets the tiny cephalopod was found and placed in to a bucket of seawater.

The octopus has been nicknamed Sadie by skipper David Pascoe.

Sadie is definitely the smallest curled octopus I have ever come across and it's probably the fact that she is so tiny that saved her from injury
Blue Reef curator Matt Slater

The fishing boat was 25 miles west of Land's End and on his return to port David contacted marine experts at the Blue Reef Aquarium to see if they would be able to care for it.

Blue Reef curator Matt Slater said: "Sadie is definitely the smallest curled octopus I have ever come across and it's probably the fact that she is so tiny that saved her from injury.

"She's in excellent condition and is a stunning specimen; capable of the most extraordinary colour changes.

"Since arriving here at the aquarium we have placed her in a quarantine tank to monitor her condition and ensure that she is feeding. However her progress is so good that we are hoping to be able to put her into one of our public displays in the next day or so," he added.

Curled octopus get their name from their slender, tapering arms which curl at the end. Although they are usually reddish brown in colour they can change shades quickly and discharge 'ink' when threatened.

They spend much of their time lying low in holes and crevices or among rocks.

Octopus have no bones or skeleton and can squeeze through any gap that their beak can fit through. Even a large octopus measuring a metre across is able to squeeze itself through a space the same size as a Smarties tube.

The octopus has a highly developed nervous system. Its eyes are like humans and it has the largest and most advanced brain of any invertebrate.




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