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Page last updated at 14:21 GMT, Monday, 8 February 2010
Bristol theatre group puts on show about St James' Fair
A scene from The Wonder Club's play, A Lamentable Tragedy
St James' Fair was a place for "trading, entertainments and thieves"

Some of Bristol's "dark and historical" past is coming back to the city, during a show which centres around the St James' Fair of 1836.

The Wonder Club theatre group is putting on 'A Lamentable Tragedy' in Stokes Croft.

The St James' Fair ran for 700 years and, at its peak, people travelled from as far as North Africa to take part.

It was eventually shut down by 'moralists' after details of its dubious content were revealed.

The event runs in Stokes Croft from 11 to 28 February, 2010, and will be held in an old two-floors motorcycle showroom.

It will be a blend of theatre, music and art and no two experiences could ever be the same.

The show will be complimented by art and installations from a broad range of Britain's emerging and established artists and illustrators, including Emma Caton, 145 Collective and Dave Bain.

'Amazing opportunity'

Artistic director Michelle Roche said: "People can come and play, wander freely, and make their own stories - we want them to be part of their history.

"When we found this space the events of this area jumped out of the history books and old newspapers.

"We're telling the forgotten stories of love, murder, performance and the fringes of the St James' Fair."

Martha Locke, a performer in the show, said: "This is a fantastic project to be involved in.

"Personally, I've had a amazing opportunity to play a character with a journey that is so relevant to our own world as well as tapping into a world of 1836."




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