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BBC News Vote 2001 Vote2001 | Audio Video 
Election Battles 1945-1997
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1987: Three on the trot for Thatcher
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Overview
Battlefield
Campaign
Personalities
Issues
Results
1987: Neil Kinnock
Kinnock was handicapped by Labours' defence policy

Watch and listen 1987
The BBC takes stock the day after the election
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Michael Heseltine resigns from the cabinet
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Margaret Thatcher: “I hope to go on and on”
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Norman Tebbit, on the “Thatcher factor”
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Kinnock the Movie
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The Alliance unveils its campaign battlebus
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1987: Glenys and Neil
Neil and Glenys Kinnock
Manifestos
Conservatives
More privatisations
Further trade union laws
Education reforms
Nuclear defence
Community charge
Labour
Scrap Trident
Increase pensions
Reduce unemployment
Scottish Assembly
The Alliance
Voting reform
Constitutional reform
Devolution

After being in power for eight years already, the Conservatives were not content to rest on what they believed were their achievements.

Eager to appear not to be running out of steam, the Tory manifesto was entitled The Next Moves Forward. It promised to spread home ownership and share ownership more widely than ever before.

More state owned industries would be "returned to the people" via privatisation and Britain’s independent nuclear deterrent would be maintained.

Defence was, for Labour, a real problem at this election.

The party was still committed to cancelling the new Trident nuclear weapons system, but coming up with a credible alternative was difficult.

This was something Neil Kinnock found when he seemed to say that Labour’s defence policy would amount to making any Soviet occupation of the UK "totally untenable".

The party also promised to reduce employment by one million in two years as well as restoring the earnings link to state pensions.

The Alliance, in its manifesto, Britain United: The Time has Come, set out the idea of the Great Reform Charter

This argued that voting reform in the shape of proportional representation would equip the UK with consensus governments, better able - it thought - to tackle the nation’s problems.