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Russian Elections 1999
The elections are as much a contest between personalities, and the power blocs they control, as a conventional electoral race between parties. Click the names on the right for an at-a-glance guide to the key figures and political groupings.
FATHERLAND-ALL-RUSSIA
UNITY
UNION OF RIGHT-WING FORCES
YABLOKO
OUR HOME IS RUSSIA
THE COMMUNIST PARTY
Boris YELTSIN
Yury LUZHKOV
Yevgeny PRIMAKOV
Vladimir PUTIN
Grigory YAVLINSKY
Gennady ZYUGANOV
Aleksander LEBED
Vladimir
ZHIRINOVSKY

The Communist Party



The Communist Party
The Communist Party won more seats than any other in the parliamentary election, but not enough to preserve its dominant position in Russia's lower house.

Communists, who previously occupied more than a third of the parliament, and could count on the support of many MPs, are now outnumbered by centrists and supporters of economic reform.

The party's programme combines diluted communism with fervent nationalism. On the economy, its leaders promise a "regulated market" and measures to stimulate production. They say the state should have a controlling stake in key sectors of industry. They would like to see measures to reduce the number of television programmes featuring murder, money and pornography, and propose censorship of films, books and television advertisements coming from abroad.

The Communist Party also favours the restoration of the USSR on a " voluntary" basis.

Some analysts believe the election results show that the Communist Party has entered a period of chronic decline. Many of its supporters are middle-aged or elderly; it holds less appeal for younger voters.

However, the election took place in unusual conditions, influenced by Russia's military success in Chechnya. If this success turns to failure, a Communist candidate could yet be a strong challenger for the presidency in June 2000.