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Front Page | In Depth | Politics
The Cabinet
 

Intro
Prime Minister
Prime Minister
Deputy Prime Minister
Deputy Prime Minister
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Home Secretary
Home Secretary
Foreign Secretary
Foreign Secretary
Lord Chancellor
Lord Chancellor
Education Secretary
Education Secretary
Minister without Portfolio
Minister without Portfolio
Leader of the Commons
Leader of the Commons
Chief Whip
Chief Whip
Culture Secretary
Culture Secretary
Transport, Local Government and the Regions Secretary
Transport, Local Government and the Regions Secretary
International Development Secretary
International Development Secretary
Work and Pensions Secretary
Work and Pensions Secretary
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Secretary
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Secretary
Leader of the Lords
Leader of the Lords
Trade Secretary
Trade Secretary
Health Secretary
Health Secretary
Scottish Secretary
Scottish Secretary
Welsh Secretary
Welsh Secretary
Northern Ireland Secretary
Northern Ireland Secretary
Defence Secretary
Defence Secretary
Treasury Chief Secretary
Treasury Chief Secretary
 
CHARLES CLARKE
Education and Skills Secretary

Charles Clarke is about as unlike his predecessor, Estelle Morris, as possible. A tough, bluff political operator, he is as capable of dishing it out as he is of taking it.

The son of a senior civil servant, he was Neil Kinnock's chief-of-staff from 1983 to 1992 - a turbulent period for the Labour Party. Before that, he had served as president of the National Union of Students, a well-trodden path to the "grown-up" world of Labour politics at Westminster.

He became an MP in 1997 and rose rapidly. Within a year he was a minister, first at education, then at the Home Office. After the 2001 general election he won a place in the cabinet as Labour party chairman.

Mr Clarke is not a straightforward Kinnockite-turned-Blairite, however, and has previously resisted identifying himself as New Labour. "I'm not a New Labour person, particularly," he has said. "I always call myself modernising old Labour."

 

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