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Biography
Griffin comes from a wealthy family with a history of involvement in right-wing politics. His father, Edgar, was a longstanding member of the Conservative party, but was expelled in August 2001 over his links with the BNP.

Griffin's sister stood as an NF candidate in a Suffolk county council election. His mother is the administration secretary of the BNP and was a candidate at the 2001 general election.

Edgar Griffin took his son to his first National Front meeting at the age of 15, but he did not join the party officially until he was a student.

Griffin went to Cambridge University in 1977, where he studied history and law at the all-male Downing College. Whilst there, he founded the Young National Front Students. He graduated with a 2:2 and a boxing blue.

Griffin was quick to rise up through the ranks of the party, becoming the national organiser by 1978.

Third Way

In 1980, Griffin launched Nationalism Today with the help of Joe Pearce, editor of Bulldog. They formulated the idea that a "third way" was needed to transcend the evils of both capitalism and communism.


Nick Griffin
Nick Griffin addressing a National Front rally
Under Griffin's control, the National Front supported Libya's Colonel Gadaffi and Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini. Griffin visited Tripoli in 1988 at Gadaffi's expense to look for funding from the Libyan regime.

The National Front gradually fell apart in the late eighties. Griffin was instrumental in founding one of the more obscure factions to come out of the split.

It was called "the International Third Position", a right-wing cross between socialism and capitalism.

In 1990, Griffin had a serious accident that left him blinded in one eye. Griffin experienced financial difficulties in 1991 after a business project he was involved in went badly wrong.

Griffin joined the BNP in 1995. He became editor of 'The Rune', a quarterly produced by Croydon BNP. Soon after, he began to edit the BNP's Spearhead magazine.

In 1999 Griffin ousted John Tyndall as leader of the party.

He was a candidate for the Oldham West and Royton constituency in the 2001 general election, winning 16.4% of vote (6552 votes).


Nick Griffin and colleague stand under a poster of Colonel Gadaffi in Tripoli
Colonel Gadaffi paid for Nick Griffin's visit to Libya

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