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1940 - 1949
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1940 - 1949
Members of the British Union of Fascists were divided over the war. Some put patriotism before ideology and joined the war effort against Hitler.

Others remained committed to their ideas. Several of these, including BUF leader Oswald Mosley, were interned under Defence Regulation 18b.

The war saw millions of people, principally Jews, murdered in the Nazi concentration camps in a programme known as The Final Solution.

The memory of the Holocaust damaged the political fortunes of post-war nazis. To overcome this it became important for future far right leaders, such as John Tyndall and Nick Griffin, to argue to their supporters that it never happened.

After 1945 there was a revival in fascist thought and a wave of violence broke out aimed at the Jewish community. Many fascist parties encouraged these attacks and riots.

Mosley began to consider the potential of media propaganda and published various material including "Mosley's Newsletter". The largest fascist party was the British League of Ex-Servicemen and Women, which held weekly meetings.

Mosley announced in November 1947 that he would form a new political party, the Union Movement. But the following year he left England for Ireland as the new party was not going as planned.


A Nazi Heinkel 111 bomber
A Nazi Heinkel 111 bomber flies over London during the Battle of Britain


Auschwitz
The Auschwitz concentration camp
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