Page last updated at 14:18 GMT, Wednesday, 9 January 2013

Leveson report debate part two

Peers remained divided on the issue of legislation versus self-regulation as debate concluded on the Leveson report into the culture and practices of the media on 11 January 2013.

Responding to the debate for the Opposition, Lord Stevenson of Balmacara applauded the efforts of Lord Hunt in setting up a new self-regulatory body, but said it would not ultimately be sufficient.

Lord Stevenson said the "anguish" caused to ordinary citizens due to press intrusion and harassment had been a "game changer" and compelled politicians to act.

Echoing the view of many peers, Lord Stevenson said he believed that "self-regulation had failed".

Responding for the government, Lord Taylor of Holbeach referred to the many peers who had pointed out the growth of online journalism and social media. Lord Taylor said any new regulations would have to be "future proofed" to take into account new technologies and new business models.

He sought to reassure peers that the government remained in contact with campaign group Hacked Off and victims of press intrusion in drawing up their response to the report.

Lord Taylor said the government had also held productive meetings with newspaper owners and editors.

He defended the proposal to use a Royal Charter instead of legislation to independently monitor the press regulator, and said the government was also considering a charitable trust to carry out the supervisory role.

In closing Lord Taylor said the "high level of consensus" in the debate encouraged him to believe a solution acceptable to all was possible.

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