Page last updated at 14:09 GMT, Monday, 25 October 2010 15:09 UK

IPCC chairman 'should be replaced'

A prominent Tory peer has questioned why the government has not made stronger moves to replace the chairman of the international body set up to study global warming.

On 25 October 2010, Baroness Noakes, a former Conservative frontbencher, said that according to an independent report published this summer, the head of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) should already have left his post.

The report by the InterAcademy Council found the IPCC, which reviews climate science for governments, needed to ensure it can handle more complex assessments of global warming and intense public scrutiny.

Dr Rajendra Pachauri has been chairman of the IPCC since 2002 and was elected for a second six-year term in 2008, but the report suggested a chairman should not remain in the role for more than the period taken to produce one climate science assessment.

Junior energy and climate change minister Lord Marland said at question time that the government retained "confidence" in the leadership of the IPCC.

Lord Marland added: "Let's look at the facts. This organisation won the Nobel Peace prize in 2007 and that should be commended. Of course, like many organisations, it will have growing pains and management issues and communication issues but it is an organisation that has 194 countries subscribing to it, so we can't just wave a magic wand and change things.

"Dr Pachauri has accepted these recommendations and is going to implement them. He has an excellent relationship with emerging markets, which is very, very important in this particular aspect. He's an eminent Yale professor who is working for free."

Other questions focused on the responsibilities of charities when placing representatives in war zones, Iranian refugees at Camp Ashra Iraq, and first-time buyers.

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