Skip to main content Text Only version of this page
BBC
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index
Games
Games
Chat
Chat
Vote
Vote
Win
Win
Quiz
Quiz
Club
Club
 Homepage
 UK
 World
 Sport
 Music
 TV/Film
 Animals
 Sci/Tech
 Weather
 Pictures
 Find Out
 The Team

Contact Us
Help
Teachers





  Celebrations as new euro is born
Updated 01 January 2002, 10.43

The euro has become the new notes and coins for millions of Europeans in 12 countries.

On the stroke of midnight, people celebrated the end of 2001 and the end of the French franc and German mark as well as 10 other well-known currencies.

'Funny colour'


More than 300 million Europeans will have to get used to the new coins and notes quickly, and some are already finding the new money a bit strange.

"It doesn't look real. It's small, isn't it? It's a funny colour. It doesn't smell like money," said one visitor to Holland.

But others were giving the currency a go: in the small French Indian Ocean island of Reunion, the first sale using the money was a kilo of lychees!

Only three European Union countries have chosen not to use the new currency: UK, Denmark and Sweden. But as fireworks and street parties celebrated the change, these countries were encouraged to switch to the euro too.

Check out the links to the right of this story for your guide to the new currency as well as the chance to win a set of euro coins!


 
Full World Section
Also in World now:
Battle rages in Iraqi rebel city
Black Watch soldier dies in Iraq
Yasser Arafat in dangerous coma
Afghanistan quiz Know world events? Try our Afghan quiz
Snowfall in Budapest Europe freezes over - check out the pix
Child slavery Helen, 12, writes about the trade of child slaves
© BBC Back to top^^
Homepage | UK | World | Sport | Music | TV/Film | Animals | Sci/Tech | Weather
Pictures | Find Out | The Team | Games | Chat | Vote | Win | Quiz | Club