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  Forming relationships
Updated 04 September 2003, 13.39
Rachel Stevens

PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Relationships

Overview
Former S Clubber Rachel Stevens has got back together with actor Jeremy Edwards, the Sun newspaper reports.

This activity encourages students to think about the factors that help form relationships.

Learning aims

  • Learn the main factors of interpersonal attraction.

  • Discuss these factors and learn from each other.
Icebreaker
Ask the class:
  • How can rumours affect possible relationships?

  • How can a celebrity romance help the careers of those involved?

  • Are celebrity relationships doomed from the start?

Jeremy Edwards and Rachel Stevens
Jeremy Edwards and Rachel Stevens

Main activity
Divide the class into groups and get them to try and agree an answer to the following two questions:

1. What are the most important factors in forming a relationship?

Social psychologists' studies give the following reasons:

  • Physical attractiveness - with romantic relationships (Silverman, 1971)
  • Living near to each other - proximity (Festinger, 1950)
  • You like someone who likes you - reciprocity (Hewitt, 1972)
  • Seeing each other around - familiarity (Zajonc, 1968)
  • Having similar interests - similarity (Newcomb, 1961)
2. Why do friends make us feel happy?

Here are some suggested reasons:

  • Enjoy shared experiences
  • We get positive feedback from mutual body language (smiling etc)
  • Support in a crisis

Extension activity
Ask students the question: "What causes relationships to break down?"

Social psychologists give the following reasons:

  • One person moves away (reverses proximity and familiarity)
  • Abuse of trust (deception)
  • Boredom
  • Life changes
  • Conflict
  • Lack of communication

Plenary
Recap on the main teaching points and hear students' responses to the question in the extension activity.

Teachers' Background

  • When asked what makes your life meaningful, the most common answers are close friends and romantic partners.

  • Male friendships tend to be less intense emotionally than female.

  • Relationships are maintained in two ways: preventative care (doing things together) and repair (talking the problem over).

  • In new couples more emphasis is placed on prevention rather than repair.

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
TeachersActivity: What is love?
MusicS Club Rachel and fiance 'having problems'
PicturesPix: S Club through the years
ChatChat: Are celebrity relationships doomed?
VoteVote: Can celeb relationships ever work?

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Web Links
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Relate
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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