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  The changing role of women
Updated 26 April 2002, 11.16


PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Prejudice and stereotypes



Elizabeth Turner provides an example of how PSHE teaching can be made dyslexia friendly.

Elizabeth is in charge of a County Dyslexia Resource at Hawarden High School, Flintshire. She is a regular contributor to British Dyslexia Association handbooks.


Overview
This activity focuses on the changing role of women in the twentieth century.

It uses the Queen Mother's lifetime as its stimulus for the perception of change.

Learning aims

  • An awareness of what it was like to be a woman in Britain in 1900 and in 2002.

  • An appreciation of changes for women in the last hundred years.
Icebreaker
Read the story

Read out this quotation from Germaine Hassall, aged 14, standing in The Mall for the funeral of the Queen Mother:

"My knowledge of the twentieth century has really improved in the last few days."

Use the quote as the initial stimulus to discuss major events of the last century.

Asking the class:

  • What was it like to be a woman in 1900 when the Queen Mother was born?

  • What is it like to be a woman in the year she died?

Suffragette leader Emily Pankhurst in 1908
Main activity
Divide the class into groups of five. Give each group a topic to investigate related to the hundred years of change in women's lives:

  • Group 1: Women and fashion
  • Group 2: Women and work
  • Group 3: Women and family life
  • Group 4: Famous women
  • Group 5: Women and their rights
Give each group these topics in group instruction sheets, with the task broken down into sequential chunks to reinforce and back up weak memory skills.

Written instruction sheets should be 'dyslexia friendly' by using the following:

  • plenty of colour
  • banks of useful words
  • appropriately-sized print
  • bullet points, headings and captions
  • pictures, diagrams and illustrations
Provide the students with relevant newspaper articles or photographs, pictures from CBBC Newsround Online, glue, scissors and A3 sheets of paper.

Encourage students to talk, select, discard and present their findings in a visual manner.

The evidence can be displayed in a collage, mind map etc.

Remind students that they are looking at change between 'then' and 'now' over a hundred year life span.

Extension activity
Using the evidence they have found, each group will report back to the class their findings or lack of them in some incidences!

For example, why are there fewer famous women in 1900 compared to 2002?

Plenary
Recap on the main teaching points and ask the class if they can spot any patterns between each group's research.

There are major changes in how women look, what they can do, and their general lifestyle. What do they consider to be the major changes?

Teachers' Background

  • The British Dyslexia Association (BDA) offers advice, information and help to Dyslexic People, their families and the professionals who support them. The charity is working to raise awareness and understanding of Dyslexia.

    BDA Helpline Tel: 0118 966 8271

  • From the day of her accession as George VI's Queen, she dedicated her life and that of her family to serving the nation and to supporting the shy and retiring King in his onerous duties as sovereign.

  • Testing times were ahead. World War II brought the terrors of the Blitz to Britain also saw the King and Queen bringing comfort to those left homeless, and worse, by the Luftwaffe's bombs.

  • With the death of her husband in 1952 and the coronation of her daughter a year later many would have expected the Queen Mother to take a back seat. But she continued to work at her royal duties.

  • She was particularly close to the Prince of Wales and the two were often seen at royal engagements in her later years.

  • The Queen Mother's relationship with Diana, Princess of Wales, was altogether more complex. Initially the two enjoyed good relations. The old Queen took the young princess, whose own position as an outsider in the Royal Family mirrored hers, under her wing.

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
UKQueen Mother is laid to rest
PicturesQueen Mother: Her life in pictures

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Web Links
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The British Dyslexia Association
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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