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  Precious things
Updated 25 June 2003, 09.03


PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Dealing with loss

Overview
Firefighters in the US are battling against wildfires which have destroyed homes and forests.

This activity encourages students to discuss which things are most precious to them and the importance of human safety.

Learning aims

  • Learn how to deal positively with their feelings in different situations

  • Develop their thinking and discussion skills
Icebreaker
Read the story

Discuss how terrible it must be to be a victim of fire and that the most important factor is the safety of the people affected.

Main activity

Students should consider the following question:

A woman searching through the debris

"If you had to decide, what would you have rescued from your burning house?"

Students decide from the list below which things are more imortant to them and why.

It may be useful to try and rank the items in order of preciousness:

  • photos
  • CDs
  • clothes
  • books
  • money
  • television
  • toys
  • pets
  • videotapes / DVDs
  • furniture
  • heirlooms
  • video games
  • posters
  • bike
  • trainers
  • trophies / awards

Extension activity
What do students think are the three most precious things in life?

Are they health, money and love?

Plenary
Students feedback their ideas and opinions about what they would rescue and what is most precious to them.

Teachers' Background

  • Grief is one's own personal experience of loss. Mourning, on the other hand is "grief gone public".

  • There is a period of shock and disbelief immediately after a disaster.

  • Many people may feel numb, or feel as though the event can't quite be real.

  • Speculation about what happened tends to follow with people seeking more information, this can sometimes become fanatical.

  • Feelings sadness or anger about the tragedy build.

  • Another response is wanting to check in with loved ones, even if they are not close to the disaster or in any immediate danger.

Turn this into an assembly
  • Engage the assembled students with volunteers who will share their points of view.

  • Use props, if available, to provide effective stimuli.

For all links and resources click at top right.


Watch/ListenBORDER=0
Watch Ellie's reportWatch Ellie's report
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More InfoBORDER=0
WorldHomes destroyed in Arizona forest fires
PicturesAustralia in flames gallery

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Web Links
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The Fire Service
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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