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  Vegetarianism
Updated 09 June 2004, 14.44
Vegetables

PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Lifestyle diversity

Overview
It seems that sticking to a vegetarian diet can be difficult. A new survey reckons one in four veggies do sometimes end up eating meat.

This activity aims to improve students' understanding of vegetarianism.

Learning aims

  • Learn about vegetarianism.

  • Discuss comments made by other students to learn from each other.
Icebreaker
Read out the list of famous people from the Teachers' Background.

What do the class think these people have in common?

Read the news story:

Read the Press Pack report:

What do the students already know about being vegetarian?

Are there any vegetarians in the class?

Main activity
Give out copies of the ten comments made by users on the message board

Divide the class into small groups and get them to rank the comments in order of how much they agree with them.

They could cut out each comment so that they can change their order more easily and then stick them on a sheet of labelled A3 paper.

Plenary
Recap on the main teaching points and allow students to present the views they most and least agree with.

Teachers' Background

  • Famous people who have said they are vegetarian include:
    • Albert Einstein (scientist)
    • Alicia Silverstone (actress)
    • Damon Albarn (singer)
    • Drew Barrymore (actress)
    • Joanna Lumley (actress)
    • Lenny Kravitz (singer)
    • Liv Tyler (actress)
    • Ricki Lake (talk-show host)
    • Sir Isaac Newton (scientist)

  • Vegetarians do not eat meat, fish, and poultry.

  • Vegans are vegetarians who don't eat or use all animal products, including milk, cheese, other dairy items, eggs, wool, silk, and leather.

  • Among the many reasons for being a vegetarian are health, ecological, and religious concerns, dislike of meat, compassion for animals, belief in non-violence, and economics.

  • The American Dietetic Association has affirmed that a vegetarian diet can meet all known nutrient needs.

  • The key to a healthy vegetarian diet, as with any other diet, is to eat a wide variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables, plenty of leafy greens, whole grain products, nuts and seeds.

  • The largest concentration of vegetarians in the world is found in India, the homeland of Buddhism and Hinduism.

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
UKVeggies admit cheating
Find OutOur guide to vegetarianism
ChatChat: Animal cruelty?
ClubIt can be difficult being a vegetarian

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Web Links
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The Vegetarian Society
Famous Veggies
Meatmatters - British Meat
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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