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  Making friends
Updated 28 November 2003, 16.08
Friends

PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Bullying and friendship

Overview
You can expect to make 363 mates during your life but you'll only be able to call six of them your true friends, a survey has found.

This activity encourages students to think about the factors that help form friendships.

Learning aims

  • Learn the main factors of friendships.

  • Discuss these factors and learn from each other.
Icebreaker
Read the story:

Ask the class:

  • How far do you agree with the number of best friends stated in the report?

  • What makes a good friend?

  • Why do good friendships sometimes break down?

Main activity
Divide the class into groups and get them to try and agree an answer to the following questions:

1. What is friendship?

A mutual relationship with a person whom one knows, likes and trusts.

2. What are the most important rules in a friendship?

Social psychologists, Argyle and Henderson, studied this in 1984 and give the following rules they found all across the world:

  • Share news
  • Show emotional support
  • Volunteer help in times of need
  • Repay debts and favours
  • Trust and confide in the other
  • Stand up for the other in their absence
  • Don't criticise in public
  • Keep confidences
  • Don't be jealous or critical of other friendships
  • Respect each other's privacy
3. Why do friends make us feel happy?

Social psychologists, Freud and Dann, gave the following reasons in 1951:

  • Enjoy shared experiences
  • We get positive feedback from mutual body language (smiling etc)
  • Support in a crisis
  • You learn more about yourself by comparing with friends

Extension activity
Ask students the question: "What causes friendships to break down?"

Social psychologists give the following reasons:

  • One person moves away (reverses proximity and familiarity)
  • Abuse of trust (deception)
  • Boredom
  • Life changes
  • Conflict
  • Lack of communication

Plenary
Recap on the main teaching points and hear students' responses to the question in the extension activity.

Teachers' Background

  • When asked what makes your life meaningful, one of the most common answers is close friends.

  • Male friendships tend to be less intense emotionally than female.

  • Relationships are maintained in two ways: preventative care (doing things together) and repair (talking the problem over).

  • Later-born children who must learn to negotiate with older, more powerful siblings tend to be more popular than first-borns (Hargreaves, 1967).

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
UKPoll uncovers friendship secrets
MusicRobbie cuts Geri from film
ChatKids comments about friends
ClubI help bullies and victims make friends

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Web Links
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