Skip to main content Text Only version of this page
BBC
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index
Games
Games
Chat
Chat
Vote
Vote
Win
Win
Quiz
Quiz
Club
Club
 Homepage
 UK
 World
 Sport
 Music
 TV/Film
 Animals
 Sci/Tech
 Weather
 Pictures
 Find Out
 The Team

Contact Us
Help
Teachers





  Dilemmas and dealing with them - Money
Updated 15 January 2003, 14.19


PSHE 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Responsibility

Overview
British children aged between 10 and 13 receive an average of 7.58 every week from pocket money and odd jobs.

This activity asks students what they would do when given control over a number of everyday dilemmas.

Learning aims

  • Consider and respond to a number of everyday dilemmas

  • Discuss their decisions with a group
Icebreaker
Read the stories

and

Ask the class:

  • How much is enough pocket money?

  • Should children have to earn their money?

  • At what age do children learn the value of money?
Ask the class to think about a time when they have had to make a tough decision.

Ask the class to consider the following situation:

You break one of your mum's special ornaments at home accidentally.

How would the class deal with this?

Main activity
Divide the class into small groups and get them to agree solutions to each of the dilemmas on the

Extension activity
Kohlberg invented a step-by-step question and answer process for understanding dilemmas.

Print some of

and give them to students to answer.

Plenary
Recap on the main teaching points and discuss the answers the students have written for each of the situations.

Teachers' Background

  • A moral dilemma involves a situation in which there are only two courses of action.

  • Each action requires performing an action that is morally wrong.

Plato's classic dilemma:

  • A man borrows a weapon from his neighbour promising to return it at the lender's request.

  • One day the lender, in a fit of rage, asks for the weapon back apparently with the intention to kill someone.

  • The man is faced with a dilemma - if he keeps his promise, then he will be an accessory to a murder. If he refuses to hand over the weapon, then he violates his promise.

Turn this into an assembly

  • Select some of the dilemmas given above or some of the situations described by Kohlberg.

  • Ask for volunteers to role-play the situations.

  • Put forward the arguments for each of the choices. It would be a good idea if selected students could do this.

  • Discuss questions raised and put each situation to the vote.

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
TeachersDilemmas and dealing with them
UKYou are the richest kids in Europe
WorldGirl finds first fake euro note

BORDER=0

Web Links
BORDER=0
Kohlberg's Dilemmas
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

BORDER=0


 


E-mail this page to a friend



Full Teachers Section
Video report:
Green school
ENGLAND curriculum relevance
SCOTLAND curriculum relevance
WALES curriculum relevance
NORTHERN IRELAND curriculum relevance
>>BBCi Schools: PSHE resources
© BBC Back to top^^
Homepage | UK | World | Sport | Music | TV/Film | Animals | Sci/Tech | Weather
Pictures | Find Out | The Team | Games | Chat | Vote | Win | Quiz | Club