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  Exploiting Antarctica
Updated 09 February 2004, 15.16
Filming in Antarctica

Citizenship 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Globalisation - environmental implications

Overview
A special Newsround programme followed presenter Lizzie on a trip to Antarctica. She looked at the impact of global warming.

This activity discusses the consequences of human exploration of the coldest place on Earth.

Learning aims

  • The environmental implications of human exploration

  • Use imagination to write a diary entry from an Antarctic scientist

Icebreaker
Read the story and diary:

Ask the students about their knowledge of life in Antarctica and raise the fact of the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and its scientists.

Main activity
Students write a diary entry as a scientist staying at the South Pole Station.

They should include the main information from the Teachers' Background section and the news story.

More diary entries are available on the British Antarctic Survey's website.

Plenary
Some students present their diary entries and the rest of the class appraise for use of empathy and descriptive quality.

Teachers' Background
Wildlife facts

  • WWF has joined other organisations in urging that it be given special protection.

  • The Southern Ocean surrounds Antarctica and has been declared an international whale sanctuary.

  • No native human population in Antarctica.

  • No large land animals.

  • Microscopic life in summer meltwater ponds.

  • Tiny wingless insects living in patches of moss and lichens.

  • Two types of flowering plants.

  • Emperor and Adélie penguins and Ross seals are dependent on the surrounding sea for food.

  • Fur and elephant seals were hunted in 19th Century.

  • In the 20th Century hunting shifted to baleen whales.

  • In 1986 the International Whaling Commission imposed a moratorium on commercial whaling.

Climate facts

  • Low temperature, high winds and frequent blizzards.

  • Warmest month average around freezing (0°C).

  • Winter average temperature as low as -57°C.

  • Continuous darkness in winter.

  • Precipitation is in the form of snow.

  • One can see for tens of miles in clear weather and mirages are common.

For all links and resources click at top right.


Web Links
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British Antarctic Survey
Mission Antarctica
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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Full Teachers Section
Full Antarctica section
LIZZIE'S DIARY
WATCH THIS EXTRA
YOUR COMMENTS
FIND OUT MORE
QUIZ
PICTURES
PRESS PACK
GLOBAL WARMING
CHAT TO LIZZIE
Full Extras section
WALES curriculum relevance
NORTHERN IRELAND curriculum relevance
ENGLAND curriculum relevance
SCOTLAND curriculum relevance
Quiz: Test yourself on rainforests
Global warming guide
>>BBCi
How green is your school? Tell Citizen X
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