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  The Leeds' footballers' trial
Updated 14 December 2001, 14.37
A Leeds nightclub
The Leeds nightclub near where the crime happened


Citizenship 11-14/KS3/Levels E&F
Crime and justice

Overview
Two role-model footballers have been tried for violent crimes.

This activity looks at the process of the Criminal Justice System (CJS) from arrest to sentencing.

Learning aims

  • Learn about what happens when someone is tried for a crime
  • Learn the name 'Criminal Justice System'
  • Develop their discussion skills
Icebreaker
Read the story

Present the guide to the Criminal Justice System to the class as useful background information.

The trial took place at Hull Crown Court so the focus should be on this kind of court.

Main activity
The class discuss the following questions:

  • Do celebrities have a responsibility to act as role-models?

  • Will juries be kinder towards celebrity defendants?

  • Should celebrities be allowed to pay for more expensive lawyers to fight their case?

  • Do celebrity convicted criminals get lighter sentences than ordinary people?
Extension activity
The trial could be used as the stimulus for a written activity where students describe the trial from one of the people involved's point of view.

They could choose from:

  • One of the defendants
  • The judge
  • A member of the jury
  • The victim
  • An eyewitness
  • The prosecuting or defending lawyer

Plenary
Recap on the five stages of the CJS and students can present their written accounts of the viewpoints.

Teachers' Background

  • The police make two million arrests every year.

  • The youth court deals only with defendants aged 17 and under. It is usually based in or near the Magistrates' Court.

  • Different rules apply to defendants who are under the age of 18.

  • Few cases are automatically sent to a Crown Court, even if the case very serious.

  • Sentences for youths are more varied than those for adults, and their parents can also be made to prevent their children from breaking the law again.
Turn this into an assembly
  • Students could represent each of the parties present in a Crown Court trial and each student gives a brief presentation about their role.

  • A group of volunteers could present the ideas from discussion questions above.

For all links and resources click at top right.


More InfoBORDER=0
SportLeeds footballer guilty of fighting in public
PicturesImages of crime
Find OutGuide to the Criminal Justice System

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Web Links
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Criminal Justice System online
Note: You will leave CBBC. We are not responsible for other websites.

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