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Last Updated: Friday January 09 2009 10:17 GMT

New female mummy found in Egypt

Archaeologists uncovering the mummy's remains

The remains of a mummy that are thought to belong to a queen who ruled a staggering 4,300 years ago have been unearthed in Egypt.

Archaeologists discovered the body of Queen Seshestet in a pyramid in Saqqara, that was found late last year.

The Queen's name wasn't with her remains, but Egypt's top archaeologist Zahi Hawass said "all the signs indicate that she is Seshestet".

Experts believe Queen Seshestet ruled Egypt for 11 years.

She was one of only a few female pharaohs.

Historians believe Queen Seshestet ruled Egypt for 11 years and was one of only a few female pharaohs.

Mr Hawass said it took five hours to open the sarcophagus, which is a special coffin made of stone, where the remains were found wrapped in linen, pottery and gold wrappings.

But all the valuables that are usually placed inside pharoahs' sarcophagus had already been stolen by grave robbers.