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Last Updated: Wednesday January 28 2009 13:22 GMT

In Pictures: Cloned animals

Dolly the sheep was born in the UK in 1996 and was the world's first cloned mammal. She lived for six years and gave birth to four lambs. Sheep normally live for 11-12 years. (PA)

Dolly the sheep was born in the UK in 1996 and was the world's first cloned mammal. She lived for six years and gave birth to four lambs. Sheep normally live for 11-12 years.

Five cloned piglets: Millie, Christa, Alexis, Carrel and Dotcom. They were born at a Virginia Tech Research Farm in the USA on March 5, 2000.

These five cloned piglets - Millie, Christa, Alexis, Carrel and Dotcom - were all born at a Virginia Tech Research Farm in the USA on March 5, 2000.

Researchers used a technique called embryo splitting to produce this rhesus monkey, a female named Tetra, at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, USA.

Researchers used a technique called embryo splitting to produce this rhesus monkey, a female named Tetra, at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center, USA.

The two cloned calves

In Japan, these two calves were cloned back in 1999 using cells found in cows milk!

Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion runs in a field near Cremona, Italy. The foal, born in February 2005, is the first horse clone produced from a race-winning champion.

Pieraz-Cryozootech-Stallion runs in a field near Cremona, Italy. The foal, born in February 2005, is the first horse clone produced from a race-winning champion.

Nicky an ordinary male cat, died in 2003.

This is Nicky, an ordinary male cat who died in 2003.

But now his owner has 'Little Nicky" - a successfully cloned cat sold by Genetic Savings and Clone for $50,000 (about 28,159).

A year later, Nicky's owners bought 'Little Nicky' - a successfully cloned cat sold by Genetic Savings and Clone for $50,000 (about 28,159).

Then in August 2005 in South Korea it was announced that the first dog had been successfully cloned. Snuppy, the Afghan hound, sits with his genetic father.

Then in August 2005, South Korea announced that the first dog had been successfully cloned there. Here's Snuppy, the Afghan hound, with his genetic father.

Scientists hope dog clones will help them understand and treat a range of serious human diseases.

Scientists hope dog clones, like Snuppy, will help them understand and treat a range of serious human diseases. His birth has also led lots of pet lovers to clone their own animals.

Mice that were cloned from frozen mice

Scientists are always trying to develop their cloning techniques, and in 2008 announced they'd successfully cloned these mice from dead mice that had been frozen for 16 years.