Skip to main content Text Only version of this page
BBC
Home
TV
Radio
Talk
Where I Live
A-Z Index
Games
Games
Chat
Chat
Vote
Vote
Win
Win
Quiz
Quiz
Club
Club
 Homepage
 UK
 World
 Sport
 Music
 TV/Film
 Animals
 Sci/Tech
 Weather
 Pictures
 Find Out
 The Team

Contact Us
Help
Teachers





  Paralympics
Paralympics
History
Disability classifications
Paralympic sports
Is Great Britain any good?

 
Paralympians are in six categories or classifications Disability classifications
Obviously not all disabled people are the same so having them all compete in the same events wouldn't be fair.

So the organisers have split the athletes into six separate categories, although some of them do differ slightly from sport to sport:

Amputee
This includes athletes who have at least one major joint in a limb missing, for example the elbow, wrist, knee or ankle.

Some amputees compete as wheelchair athletes depending on the sport.

Cerebral palsy
This is a disorder of movement and posture due to damage to an area, or areas, of the brain that control and coordinate muscle tone, reflexes, posture and movement.

Cerebral means brain-centred and palsy is a lack of muscle control.

Intellectual disability
A person with an intellectual disability must have functioning limitations in two or more skill areas.

These are communication, self-care, home living, social skills, community use, self-direction, health and safety, functional academics, leisure and work.

Competitors must also have acquired their condition before age 18.

At the moment elite athletes with intellectual disabilities are only allowed to compete at the Paralympic Games in exhibition events.

Wheelchair
Generally athletes compete in this category if they have at least a 10% loss of function in their lower limbs.

Common conditions include traumatic paraplegia and quadriplegia, spina bifida, poliomyelitis, amputees, cerebral palsy and all non ambulant les autres athletes.

Vision impaired
Athletes come under this classification if they have any condition which interferes with 'normal' vision.

This incorporates the entire range of vision difficulties from correctable conditions through to total blindness.

Les Autres
This French term for 'the others' is used to describe athletes with a range of conditions, such as dwarfism, that don't fit into the traditional classification systems of the established disability groups.

Within these six disability categories athletes are then grouped according to their differing level of impairment.


E-mail this page to a friend



   back next   
© BBC Back to top^^
Homepage | UK | World | Sport | Music | TV/Film | Animals | Sci/Tech | Weather
Pictures | Find Out | The Team | Games | Chat | Vote | Win | Quiz | Club