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  Culling animals
What is a cull?
Culls in the news
Arguments for culling animals
Arguments against culling animals

 
Kangeroo Arguments for culling animals
Kangeroo

Arguments in favour of culling animals:

  • Animals should be culled to protect other species. E.g. Hedgehogs eat the eggs of rare wading birds such as the dunlin, redshank and oystercatcher.

  • Animals should be culled to protect people's way of making a living. E.g. Deer damage farmers' crops and seals make holes in fishermen's nets. A spokesman in favour of seal culling has argued: "It is like someone driving a car through your shop window."

  • Animals need to be culled to stop them eating food sources. E.g. It has been reported that one seal colony in the Outer Hebrides eats 75,000 tonnes of fish every year.

  • The population of certain animals with no predators, such as deer, will keep increasing unless they are culled. E.g. Bears and wolves in Herefordshire no longer pose a threat to deer, which are causing millions of pounds of damage to trees and crops.

  • Culling helps to keep surviving creatures fit and strong. E.g. The Forestry Commission, which employ hundreds of professional deer stalkers, argues that culling leads to healthy deer.

  • Culling animals could generate a lot of cash for local people. E.g. In northern Australia, tourists paying thousands of dollars to go on a crocodile hunt would give poor landowners some much-needed money.

  • The carcases of culled animals are not just burned or buried. They can be used for seal pelt coats or venison (deer meat).

  • Some animals pose a danger to humans. E.g. Saltwater crocodiles in Australia are believed to have killed more than a dozen people in the past 20 years.

  • Some animals are not native to the area and have been introduced by humans. Therefore they can be taken away by man as well. E.g. Hedgehogs were introduced to the Outer Hebridean Islands.


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