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  We filmed a play with kids in Jamaica
Updated 17 February 2004, 10.11
The quake hits!
Emily and Yashwant's school drama project gave them a chance to perform to kids in Jamaica, without ever leaving their own school.

Here's how it happened and what they thought of it.

"When our teacher told us we were doing a video conference I was really excited.

I knew how it worked because my class helped raise the money to buy video conference equipment for Mona Heights, our sister school in Jamaica.

Joined up production

Our two schools did a joint drama and dance production called the Jericho stone. It's the story of an earthquake destroying the town of Port Royal in Jamaica.

Each school did different bits, and then we sent video tapes to each other so that the whole thing could be joined up into one production.


Our school's year 6 choir sang a song called the stone and the kids from Jamaica did a dance to show the earthquake happening.

Light clothing

Doing the video conference meant we could do some of our performance live.

On the morning of the conference we had to wear light coloured T shirts that would show up well on the interactive whiteboard in Jamaica.

Heads and shoulders

In the IT room we dialled up Mona Heights on the video phone.

On our whiteboard we saw loads of kids, there were about 40 crammed into a classroom, we could just see their heads and shoulders.

They spoke first, said hello and welcomed us. Then it was time to do our play."

Yashwant, 11, London


"We moved our chairs closer to the screen and started the play.

We could see the faces of the children in Jamaica watching us, it was like they were in the audience.

Mural of Mona Heights
Mural of Mona Heights
We acted out how the children of Port Royal would have felt when they saw the walls of their homes shaking from the earthquake.

Sad goodbye

When we finished they clapped and said goodbye.

They were smiling but they looked a bit sad because we were about to go.

More questions

It was 11.00am in London but it was 6.00am in Jamaica and Mona Heights had all come in to school early to see our drama.

If we do another video conference I want to ask them if they have a beach near the school, what time the school starts and finishes, if they have a big playground and if they ever have wet weather at break time."

Emily, 10, London


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