BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Arabic Spanish Russian Chinese Welsh
BBCi CATEGORIES   TV   RADIO   COMMUNICATE   WHERE I LIVE   INDEX    SEARCH 

BBC NEWS
 You are in:  World: Monitoring
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 


Commonwealth Games 2002

BBC Sport

BBC Weather

SERVICES 
Sunday, 23 November, 1997, 17:57 GMT
Lieberman resigns after row with Netanyahu over Likud referendum

The head of Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu's office, Avigdor Lieberman, resigned on Sunday following an argument with Netanyahu over the premier's decision to hold a referendum among Likud voters on scrapping party primaries, Israel Radio reported.

Netanyahu accepted Lieberman's resignation and expressed appreciation for his contribution.

The radio said Lieberman's resignation came as a surprise to aides in the prime minister's bureau and to Likud members.

He intends to turn his attention to his business interests and political activity in the Likud.

Lieberman's associates have already proposed two candidates for the vacant job: Moshe Leon, director of the prime minister's bureau, and Arye Zeif, former director of the Customs Authority.

Science and Technology Minister Mikhael Eytan said Lieberman's departure would strengthen Netanyahu's position.

He said Lieberman was responsible for the big blunder which brought Likud to a serious crisis during the recent party convention.

The main opposition Labour Party said Lieberman's resignation was yet another stage in the collapse of Netanyahu's "domino government", and that it had come too late.

It said the man responsible for the government's flawed performance was the prime minister himself, the radio added.

BBC Monitoring (http://www.monitor.bbc.co.uk), based in Caversham in southern England, selects and translates information from radio, television, press, news agencies and the Internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages.


E-mail this story to a friend