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Monday, May 10, 1999 Published at 10:27 GMT 11:27 UK


Jiang statement - Nato's 'barbarous act'



China's President Jiang Zemin described the Nato bombing of the Chinese embassy in Belgrade as "an utmost barbarous act, and a gross violation of Chinese sovereignty, which is rare in the diplomatic history," according to the Chinese news agency Xinhua.

"US-led Nato should bear all the responsibilities arising therefrom," Mr Jiang told President Yeltsin in a telephone hotline conversation.

Kosovo: Special Report
The Chinese president said the Nato attack against Yugoslavia, a sovereign state, bypassing the United Nations, was a demonstration of " absolute gun-boat policy".

"This is a very dangerous trend, which should arouse the vigilance of statesmen all over the world," he noted.

Mr Jiang said that China and Russia, two permanent members of the UN Security Council and two countries playing an important role in the world, shoulder significant responsibility on upholding justice and maintaining peace.

Security council cannot discuss plan

"At present, the halting of Nato's attack against Yugoslavia constitutes the prerequisite of the solving of the Kosovo crisis," he said.

"With the bombing continuing, it is impossible for the UN Security Council to discuss any plan to solve the problem, and any plan to be made should be acceptable to Yugoslavia," President Jiang stated.

He told Mr Yeltsin that the two countries had conducted " sound cooperation" in major international issues, including Kosovo, and he suggested that the two countries maintain close consultation and further coordination.

President Yeltsin expressed "his utmost indignation over the US-led Nato's barbarous act of attacking on the Chinese embassy in Belgrade", Xinhua said.



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