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Friday, March 26, 1999 Published at 14:35 GMT


Serbian media assesses damage

Serb TV shows the Montenegrian capital of Podgorica being bombed

Serbian media led with reports on the impact of the Nato air strikes in their Thursday morning news.

Kosovo: Special Report
The Belgrade-based independent Radio B92 said that a soldier had been killed in raids on Montenegro, but no civilian casualties were reported.

Serbian state radio quoted the Belgrade Centre for Information and Alarm as saying that "there were no casualties in the criminal attack by Nato forces on the Belgrade area", but added that expert teams had yet to assess the material damage.

The radio's correspondent in the Kosovo capital Pristina said "another nine missiles fired by the Nato criminal force hit the Pristina area after midnight. Smoke was seen southwest of the town ."

The correspondent went on to quote eyewitnesses in Vucitrn and Kosovska Mitrovica in northern Kosovo as saying that "in the first aggressive attack by Nato aircraft on targets in the FRY, the Yugoslav Army's air defence shot down one aircraft on Mt.Cicavica, 3 km west of Vucitrn, at about 2200" .

Enemy missile shot down

The radio's correspondent in Novi Sad, northern Serbia said the "tragic outcome of the 17 missiles that were fired at four towns in Vojvodina - Sombor, Pancevo, Kula, and Novi Sad - is four wounded." "One enemy missile was shot down in the Kula area," the correspondent added.

From Kraljevo, south of Belgrade, the radio said: "One missile hit the runway of the military airport in Ladjevici near Kraljevo after 2000 last night.

As we have learned unofficially, the missile did not cause great material damage, nor were there any casualties. We have also learned that cruise missiles targeted the transmitters on Mt. Kopaonik."

From Uzice, western Serbia, it said that "Nato aircraft fired several missiles at the Ponikve airfield and one military facility near Uzice.

According to the Uzice Corps Information Service, no one was wounded, and there were no casualties." Prokuplje, in southern Serbia was reported to have been hit by "three projectiles during Nato's aggression" .

"The projectiles hit the barracks, causing material damage. There were no casualties. Several soldiers were wounded slightly and were immediately admitted to the Prokuplje health centre," the radio said.

B 92 dismisses reports

According to B92, the air strikes failed to hit a key weapons factory in Kragujevac, in central Serbia and rejected reports that the Zastava car and weapons factory was on fire.

"A Kragujevac TV team has gone to the spot and found out that Zastava has not been hit.

Three missiles were reported to have hit the Milan Blagojevic barracks in Kragujevac but "since the barracks were empty and soldiers on their positions, only material damage was inflicted" , B92 added.

Reporting from the Montenegrin capital Podgorica, Serbian radio said that Nato had hit the Golubovci airport as passengers were disembarking from an internal flight.

"Podgorica is completely calm, after the criminal bombing by Nato forces, which started at 2030 last night.

"Nato aircraft hit the Golubovci military airport with several missiles. Bombs also hit the civilian airport at the time when the Belgrade-Podgorica civil aircraft was landing.

"According to eyewitness, bombs exploded around the plane as the passengers were disembarking. Fortunately, no one was wounded or killed. The Podgorica-Petrovac main road was also hit."

The radio went on to describe the impact of the bombing elsewhere in Montenegro.

"The aggressor's aircraft also hit the Danilovgrad barracks. We have learnt from a source close to the Yugoslav Army that three guards were wounded, one of them seriously.

They are already undergoing treatment in the Podgorica medical centre."



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