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Monday, 3 November, 1997, 09:16 GMT
Hong Kong democrats urge Beijing to overturn Tiananmen verdict

Hong Kong's Democratic Party has called on China to reverse its verdict on the 1989 pro-democracy movement.

The appeal follows President Jiang Zemin's remark in the United States which indicated that Beijing might have made a mistake cracking down on demonstrators in Tiananmen Square.

It was the first time a Chinese leader has publicly acknowledged criticism of the crackdown.

But Democratic Party Vice-Chairman Anthony Cheung told Hong Kong radio that Jiang should go further.

"I think it's always good that leaders are not so complacent as not to admit the possibility of making mistakes," Cheung said.

"But I think if the Chinese government is really sincere about doing something about Tiananmen, I think the best way to do is to try to remove the label which was given to the 1989 student movement by saying that movement was counter-revolutionary or anti-government.

"We are still standing by our demand that the verdict on the 1989 student movement should be reverted and the best way to do that, in our view, is for the National People's Congress to set up a special investigation commission to really look into what happened during those months in 1989 and to establish the facts," he said.

BBC Monitoring (http://www.monitor.bbc.co.uk), based in Caversham in southern England, selects and translates information from radio, television, press, news agencies and the Internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages.


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