Page last updated at 14:44 GMT, Wednesday, 13 January 2010

Sex website row led to wife murder, Swansea trial told

Paul Grabham
Paul Grabham and his wife both worked as prostitutes

A husband killed his wife and dumped her body by a motorway in a suitcase after they rowed over his use of casual sex websites, a court has heard.

Paul Grabham, 26, denies murdering Kirsty Grabham, 24, at their flat in Swansea after a night out.

Swansea Crown Court heard both the Grabhams worked as prostitutes and had their own website offering services.

Prosecutors said they fell out in March 2008 over her suspicions he had been using so-called "dogging" websites.

The court heard Mr Grabham met his wife at a massage parlour where she worked as a prostitute.

Three months later they married in February 2008, but the jury was told they had a "stormy and volatile" relationship.

Their relationship was stormy. Paul gave the impression that he was possessive, often cuddling her
Gregg Taylor, prosecuting

The prosecution said the Grabhams had a row during a night out in Swansea after they fell out over his suspected use of casual sex websites.

Gregg Taylor, prosecuting said: "Paul Grabham knew she worked as a prostitute because that is how he met her, in a massage parlour."

He said the couple set up a website "offering their services separately or together."

But within months of marrying, Mr Grabham began accessing websites which were used by people looking for casual sex with strangers.

Mr Grabham opened 10 different accounts and although at first the couple accessed the sites together, it could have been simply to view the material displayed, said the prosecution.

Kirsty Grabham
Kirsty Grabham's body was found alongside the M4 near Bridgend

But by early 2009, Mrs Grabham began telling friends and relatives she believed her husband was using the sites to meet other women.

On the strain in the relationship, Mr Taylor told the jury: "There could have been any number of reasons why.

"Paul Grabham had been using dogging sites and Kirsty had found out he had been trying to find a woman," he added.

Mr Taylor said Mrs Grabham would bring male clients back to her flat and Mr Grabham would "make himself scarce".

"Paul Grabham also offered himself as a prostitute, offering several services to both men and women," Mr Taylor said.

Violent argument

He said the couple had a joint website where they also sold their services together and separately.

"Their relationship was stormy. Paul gave the impression that he was possessive, often cuddling her."

He said they were often heard arguing in the thin-walled flat they lived in by neighbours who became used to their rows.

On one occasion the couple were at a party in a friend' and got into a violent argument after both had taken drugs.

Mr Grabham was then seen to hold his wife off the ground with one hand around her throat as he jammed her against the front door, Mr Taylor said.

He said one friend was so frightened that Mrs Grabham would be killed that she pleaded with her husband to let her go.

In March 2009, shortly before she died, neighbours heard her shouting that Mr Grabham had "strangled her so hard she had wet herself."

Mrs Grabham was last seen getting into a taxi in the early hours of 29 March, 2009 after a night out with her husband and friends, but the jury was told the couple could be seen shouting at each other at a nightclub during the evening.

Her body was found by a lorry driver on an embankment of the M4 in the Laleston area of Bridgend a week later.

The case is continuing.



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