Page last updated at 13:06 GMT, Friday, 7 May 2010 14:06 UK

Labour's Albert Owen doubles majority on Anglesey

The count at Llangefni on Anglesey
The count at Llangefni on Anglesey saw Albert Owen win with 11,490 votes

Labour's Albert Owen has doubled his majority to hold on to his seat on Anglesey - bucking national trends.

Plaid Cymru had targeted the seat, but they came second.

In north west Wales only Aberconwy - where the boundaries had changed slightly - ditched Labour in favour of Conservative Guto Bebb.

Plaid Cymru's Hywel Williams and Elfyn Llwyd kept their seats in Arfon and Dwyfor Meirionnydd respectively, as did Conservative David Jones in Clwyd West.

Mr Owen now starts a third term representing Anglesey.

Labour's aim on the island had been to maintain the Labour majority of 1,200 votes, but in the end Mr Owen doubled that.

Following the declaration Mr Owen said Anglesey did not follow national trends.

Ian Black
I wanted to ask about jobs, disability entitlements and pensions
Ian Black, Holyhead

It had been a hard campaign fought on 'local issues' such as job losses, he added.

On a wet Friday morning at Holyhead, the election results were being discussed in shop doorways and on street corners.

It is a friendly place where people greet each other by name on the street.

It has suffered particularly due to the economic downturn and the loss of nearly 400 jobs, when Anglesey Aluminium closed its smelting plant last year, was an extra blow.

The high street bears the scars with numerous closed and boarded-up shops and businesses.

The response to the campaign and election results was varied.

Campaigning styles on the island had disappointed Ian Black, who said he had read all the leaflets stuffed through his letterbox, but not a single candidate had knocked on his door.

What's the point of complaining about a situation if you don't vote to try and change it?
Holyhead resident

"I am disappointed as you can't ask a leaflet a question, can you?

"I'd have listened to all their arguments, and I wanted to ask about jobs, disability entitlements and pensions, because my mother is on her pension," he added.

Hugh Williams agreed that the campaigning "wasn't what it used to be".

"I was disappointed at how things were done as the candidates seemed to be around very little," he said.

"But maybe things are changing... and it's just a sign of the times."

Young mother Lisa McDowall said she had voted, but was uncertain of the outcome.

"There's nothing in this town, especially since the out-of-town shops opened," she said.

"I'm not sure if the election will change anything," she added.

For sale and to let signs line the street at Holyhead
For sale and to let signs line the street at Holyhead

Plaid Cymru's Ieuan Wyn Jones represents the island in the Welsh Assembly Government, but the party polled 1,461 fewer votes that Labour's Albert Owen who won with 11,490 votes.

This had been "a bit of a surprise" to Griff Thomas, who thought Plaid would have done better.

Knife crime was at the forefront of Eurwyn Hughes's mind.

The town has suffered its own knife tragedy with the death of local car mechanic Leon Jones, and the subsequent prison sentence of another Holyhead man, Scott Whitley, for his murder.

"I think they should bring back capital punishment," said Mr Hughes.

"There was a story in the paper last week about how soft jail is - it's no deterrent," he added.

There was some apathy too, and one woman said she had been surprised at the lack of interest shown in the election by some townsfolk.

"Voting is important to get your voice heard," she said.

"The thought of not voting would never cross her mind. What's the point of complaining about a situation if you don't vote to try and change it?"



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