Page last updated at 11:27 GMT, Monday, 8 February 2010

New bell plan near site of 'lost kingdom' off Aberdyfi

A bell has already been installed at Appledore in Devon
A bell has already been installed at Appledore in Devon

Villagers where some claim the bells of a legendary "lost kingdom" ring under the waves may find they definitely hear tolling with the tide.

Aberdyfi in Gwynedd is near the legendary kingdom Cantre'r Gwaelod and has been chosen as a possible site for an artist's "time and tide bell".

Twelve of the bells are planned at sites around the UK in a project by Marcus Vergette.

A public meeting will be held in Neuadd Dyfi at 1930 GMT on Tuesday.

In principle, it could sit well with the village, it does feel right
Dave Williams, community council chairman

One bell has already been installed by Vergette, a sculptor, film-maker, composer and musician, at Appledore in Devon.

Aberdyfi could be the location for a bell on the western coast.

The village community council chairman, Dave Williams, said no decision had been made on the plan, and the meeting was a bid to gauge public opinion.

"We feel as a council that this could fit in very well in Aberdyfi, because of Cantre'r Gwaelod, and the bells of Aberdyfi," he said.

"But we want to know what local people feel about it before taking it any further."

Aberdyfi jetty
One location for the bell could be near the jetty

Mr Williams said there may be concerns about the level of noise produced by the bell, and whether it would create a nuisance for local people.

"In principle, it could sit well with the village, it does feel right," he added.

Mr Vergette said the integrity of the whole project depended on the sites chosen.

He said he liked Aberdyfi because of the historical links to the past, but also because of its location between north and south Wales.

"But also it's such a fantastic location," he added.

The artists said villagers should not be concerned about any noise issues, and that control of the project would be very much in their hands.

"It is designed to be low, it isn't like a church bell... it's meant to be reflective, to be relatively quiet," he said.

He added the volume of the bell could be adjusted and no-one should have to be "kept awake at night".

"If the bell is accepted, the volume, placement, frequency and the inscription I would like the community to decide for themselves," he said.



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