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Last Updated: Monday, 20 November 2006, 17:25 GMT
Lloyd George nephew dies, aged 94
Dr WRP George
Dr WRP George: a 'solid and determined' person
A nephew of World War I Prime Minister David Lloyd George, and one of the oldest working solicitors in Wales, has died at the age of 94.

Dr WRP George was born in Criccieth, Gwynedd, in 1912.

Dr George was an archdruid and was an accomplished novelist and bard who had won awards at the Eisteddfod. He was also a judge and former councillor.

He had also written about the life of David Lloyd George, whom he called Uncle David.

Dr George had practiced as a solicitor in Porthmadog since qualifying in 1934, and also served for a period as a deputy circuit judge.

He won the crown at the Eisteddfod in 1974 for a free metre poem called Tān (Fire) and was known in Gorsedd circles as Ap Llysor.

He took pride in the name of William George & Son, and even at 94 he was in touch with the office daily, never missing the opportunity to offer sound advice
Robert Price, solicitor
He was the author of several books, the most recent being his autobiography "88 not out," published in 2001.

He was a councillor with both Caernarfon and later Gwynedd councils, and received the CBE for services to Welsh culture and local government.

Elfed Roberts, director of the National Eisteddfod, recalled working with Dr George when he organised his first Eisteddfod in 1986-87.

'Solid and determined'

"WRP George was chairman of the local working group for the Bro Madog Eisteddfod.

"He was exceptionally good as the chairman because of his experience and his dedication - he had great strength.

"For a novice organiser he was a big help and his opinions and advice were worth having."

Another former archdruid, Jām Niclas, said he would miss Dr George as a friend.

Mr Niclas said he was a "solid and determined" person who was able to get things done in a quiet way.

Robert Price, a fellow solicitor and partner in the William George and Son legal practice in Porthmadog, said he would be "a tremendous loss to the legal profession and the local community".

"He took pride in the name of William George & Son, and even at 94 he was in touch with the office daily, never missing the opportunity to offer sound advice.

"He was currently preparing for an appearance at an important public inquiry in three weeks' time."




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