Page last updated at 12:31 GMT, Thursday, 24 September 2009 13:31 UK

Kellogg's strike ballot cancelled

Kellogg's plant in Wrexham
A statement said strike ballot plans were now "off the table"

A ballot on strike action at the Kellogg's factory in Wrexham has been called off after a deal was agreed over redundancies.

The cereals firm had planned to cut 40 jobs from the 521-strong workforce.

However, in a joint statement, Kellogg's and the union Usdaw said ballot proposals were "off the table".

They said 25 staff had left through voluntary redundancy or early retirement, but there would be no more job cut proposals this year.

The statement said: "Kellogg's and Usdaw held further discussions last week, which have been very constructive and are now complete.

"Both Kellogg's and Usdaw are pleased to announce that a settlement has been reached that is backed by both parties.

"This means Usdaw has taken the proposals to hold an industrial action ballot off the table and the consultation will restart."

Kellogg's had said the cuts were part of an efficiency review rather than caused by the economic climate.

The statement said the ongoing consultation "will explore the efficiencies and savings Kellogg's need to make and how they can be best achieved across all areas of the plant".

The company has had a factory in Wrexham for 31 years, producing All Bran, Bran Flakes and Special K brand cereals, and is one of the biggest employers in the town.



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