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Last Updated: Sunday, 15 January 2006, 09:13 GMT
Woman given Asbo for suicide bids
Aberystwyth promenade
Amy Dallamura is banned from parts of the promenade and beaches
A woman who has tried many times to kill herself has been given an Asbo banning her from much of her home town's seafront.

Police were granted the anti-social behaviour order after emergency services were called out at least 36 times to save Amy Dallamura, aged 42.

One policeman received a bravery award after pulling her out of the sea off Aberystwyth three years ago.

But Ms Dallamura said pain from health problems had led her to "desperation".

My sanity has never been the problem, but the pain has led me to make desperate decisions about my future
Amy Dallamura

Aberystwyth magistrates have approved the order barring her from entering the sea, the beaches, parts of the promenade and walking on the town's Constitution Hill.

Insp Alun Samuel, of Dyfed-Powys Police, said he believed it was the first Asbo of its type in Wales, but it was the force's only option to stop Ms Dallamura.

Dyfed-Powys Police applied for the Asbo after the emergency services were called out at least 36 times.

Pc Simon Tudor
Pc Simon Tudor swam out 300m one January morning to make a rescue

Insp Samuel, who gave evidence to an earlier court hearing, told the BBC Wales News website that problems with Ms Dallamura stretched back to 2001.

Pc Simon Tudor, based in Aberystwyth, was given the title of bravest officer in Wales at the Police Federation's courage awards after he plunged into freezing waters in the town's harbour to rescue her in the early hours in January 2003.

Pc Tudor had to let go of the safety line because it was not long enough, and she was 300m from shore by the time he reached her.

We thought what she was doing was anti-social. It was causing the public who witnessed what she did distress
Insp Alun Samuel

Insp Samuel said some members of the public had been alarmed by her numerous suicide attempts.

As well as police, the RNLI, coastguard, ambulance service and the RAF's air and sea rescue helicopter had all been involved in rescuing her over the years.

"Meetings have been held to assess Ms Dallamura's mental state, but experts have been satisfied she suffers from no mental illness," he said.

"We took the step of applying for an Asbo because in our view we thought what she was doing was anti-social. It was causing the public who witnessed what she did distress."

Ms Dallamura said bouts of depression had been brought on by her poor health, although she was feeling better now.

She said hip and back problems had resulted in her suffering severe pain which had led to her suicide attempts.

Ms Dallamura, who uses crutches, said: "I never wanted anyone to risk their life to save me and I never wanted anyone to see me attempt to take my own life.

"I have nearly died on the two or three times I've been out in the sea. I was saved when an infra-red camera on a helicopter was used to find me in 2002."

She added: "My health has deteriorated over the last nine years and I've had major surgery four times and an unsuccessful hip replacement.

"My sanity has never been the problem, but the pain has led me to make desperate decisions about my future."


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