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Last Updated: Monday, 15 March, 2004, 17:08 GMT
Lake treasures go on display
Ninth century long boat
The log boat was found in 1925 by a local carpenter
Rare artefacts from the 9th Century discovered on an island at a Brecon Beacons lake are going on display for the first time.

Most of the objects were found on the man-made island in Llangorse Lake between 1989 and 1993 by archaeologists from the National Museums and Galleries of Wales and Cardiff University.

But it is only now they are being put on display as part of a scheme to loan items from national collections to museums where they have local significance.

The centrepiece of the exhibition at Brecknock Museum and Art Gallery in Brecon is a log boat discovered in the lake by a local carpenter in 1925.

It is a great idea to allow important exhibits to be displayed to the public for the first time
David Moore

"This exhibition will be of enormous interest to local people because Llangorse Lake is only six miles from Brecon," said museum curator David Moore.

"All these exhibits date back to the 9th Century to a settlement that only lived there for about 20 years.

"It is a great idea to allow important exhibits to be displayed to the public for the first time."

The island at Llangors Lake was identified as man-made in the 1860s.

Oak planks forming a defensive palisade have been tree-ring dated to the middle of the 9th Century.

It has now been established that the crannog was built in stages between 889 and 893 and it was a royal residence for the Welsh kingdom of Brycheiniog.

Medieval inscribed stones
The museum's collection of medieval stones will be displayed

The site may be the one referred to in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle as being destroyed by a Mercian Army in AD916.

Also on display at the Brecon exhibition is a fragment of the border of a dress or tunic which has been preserved in the lake's silt, jewellery, and part of an enamelled container for relics.

Close parallels for the man-made island or crannog, the only one known in Wales, are found in Ireland.

The museum's collection of early medieval inscribed stones and stone sculpture dating back to the 6th century is also being redisplayed at the exhibition.

The exhibition is being opened by the Culture Minister Alan Pugh on Monday and it will run at the museum until mid September.




SEE ALSO:
Hoard adds weight to museum bid
10 Mar 04  |  North East Wales


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