Page last updated at 17:10 GMT, Wednesday, 7 October 2009 18:10 UK

Capital bans alcohol from streets

Cardiff at night
Cardiff has gained a reputation for a drinking culture

Drinking on the streets of Cardiff has been banned under new laws designed to tackle anti-social behaviour.

An order banning drinking in public spaces has been extended across the whole city following a trial period in four areas in the capital.

Failure to surrender drinks could lead to an arrest.

Police and council leaders say alcohol-fuelled crime is a major problem, with more than half of crimes in Cardiff as a result of excessive drinking.

What this scheme isn't designed to do is prevent people from having a picnic in the park with an alcoholic drink
Councillor Ed Bridges, Cardiff Council

The ban comes under the Designated Public Place Order (DPPO), which gives police powers to confiscate and dispose of alcohol.

Officials say that the order is designed to protect the public from irresponsible drinking and reduce alcohol related violence.

Councillor Ed Bridges, chair of the public protection committee said: "What this scheme isn't designed to do is prevent people from having a picnic in the park with an alcoholic drink.

"But if people are creating disorder or behaving anti-socially because of alcohol, the Police can ask that person to stop drinking in a public place without the need for an arrest.

"If the introduction of this order helps to reduce alcohol-related violence, it can only benefit the city," he said.



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01 Jan 04 |  South West Wales
Borough's ban on street drinking
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