Page last updated at 10:38 GMT, Sunday, 6 September 2009 11:38 UK

Gatwick crash woman's lift favour

Melanie Wisden
Melanie Wisden had an 11-year-old daughter called Mia and worked in a Starbucks coffee shop in Cardiff

A woman who died when her car was in a collision with a coach at Gatwick airport had just dropped her friend off for a flight, it has been revealed.

Melanie Wisden, 34, from Cardiff, was killed instantly when her Ford Ka was crushed by a National Express coach just after 1330 BST on Friday.

Ms Wisden, who worked at a cafe, had an 11-year-old daughter, Mia.

Her mother Valerie told the Wales on Sunday newspaper: "It's such a waste of life - it's all just gone."

She added: "We're going to miss her so much. She will always be in our hearts for ever and ever."

She had taken the day off work from her job at Starbucks to carry out the trip to the second busiest airport in the country.

More than 100 people have left tribute messages on a Facebook page set up in memory of Ms Wisden by her sister Maxine.

The collision on Airport Way caused severe delays as access to the North Terminal was not possible from junction 9 of the M23 while collision investigators worked at the scene.

The coach driver was taken to hospital suffering from shock while a passenger had a wrist injury.

All roads were reopened by 2000 BST by which time there were several abandoned cars in the roads approaching the airport.

BBC Sussex radio reported people getting out of their vehicles and running towards the airport with their suitcases.

Passengers using the airport were advised to allow extra time for their journeys.



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